Google Turns Blind Eye to Hidden Text on U.S. Brand-Name Web Sites

Share Article

BMW.de delisted while U.S. brands manipulate search giant's results.

News Image
Why go all the way to Germany to make an example of a brand-name Web site, while well-known American firms violate those same guidelines to improve their rankings?

Search Engine Optimization Specialist, Robert G. Medford, today released findings indicating that Google has allowed American brand-name Web sites to disregard the search giant's Webmaster Guidelines while choosing to remove German auto manufacturer, BMW from their results pages for violations of the same. Additional information is currently available at http://www.searchengineoptimizationsecrets.com.

"Let me begin by saying that Google is of course free to include or exclude Web sites as it sees fit, and enforce their guidelines at their sole discretion. However, the current situation raises questions regarding selective enforcement," said Mr. Medford, a veteran of the search marketing industry. "Why go all the way to Germany to make an example of a brand-name Web site, while well-known American firms violate those same guidelines to improve their rankings?"

As top search engine rankings can be worth millions of dollars in revenue, many businesses knowingly risk removal form Google's index by utilizing "black-hat" search engine optimization (SEO) techniques in order to better the competition. Black-hat tactics are SEO practices that violate the guidelines set forth by Google and other search engines. Sites that employ these methods are known as "search engine spammers." Google is noted for its commitment to filtering out sites utilizing techniques that violate published guidelines and in their eyes compromise the integrity of their search results.

The BMW incident marked a significant departure for Google, as it was the first time that a brand-name Web site had been publicly removed from its index for guideline violations. Although only a small fraction of removals are announced via an unofficial spokesperson, such previous pronouncements were limited to relatively-unknown small business sites.

Medford continued, "One would think that BMW's removal -- albeit short-lived -- would have sent a very clear message to corporate giants the world over that attempts to manipulate rankings would not be tolerated. However, this is clearly not the case. Of the 12 brand-name Web sites featured in my December, 2005 report, two have removed their hidden text, nine have made no discernible changes, and one has placed additional hidden text on their home page," said Medford.

Additional information including URLs and analysis is currently available at http://www.searchengineoptimizationsecrets.com.

About Robert G. Medford

Robert has been a student of search engine optimization techniques since 1999. He currently provides search marketing consulting services to a growing list of firms throughout the U.S.

# # #

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Visit website