National Media Informs Consumers the Value of Probiotics 750 Trillion Bacteria Reside in Your Stomach at Any One Time -- Make Sure They're the 'Good Guys'

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Over 178,000 people are affected by "bad bacteria" after antibiotic therapy. Replacing beneficial bacteria through supplementation, especially after antibiotic use, can reestablish the good bacteria and help boost the immune system.

In a recent interview with Dr. Jonathan La Pook from Columbia University Medical Center on The Today Show with Katie Couric, Dr. La Pook revealed the dangers of killing off friendly bacteria in the gut with overuse of antibiotics. He went on to say, "When you upset the apple cart, you disturb the balance... It's important for any individuals that have taken antibiotics to reintroduce good, friendly bacteria in the form of probiotics to maintain GI health."

Additionally, Mary Carmichael of Newsweek International also wrote about the antibiotic/probiotic relationship. "Lately, docs have been taking an interest in probiotic supplements, which may help control infections. In a recent German study, subjects taking three probiotics found that their colds were shorter and less severe. Probiotics may even help ward off some of the most dangerous germs, like Clostridium difficile, a nasty bug that sometimes infects the colon after hospital patients are given strong antibiotics. To avert off Clostridium, some docs are experimentally dosing their patients with gut flora. Probiotic supplements are becoming more common in health-food stores, too.”

Researchers in Sweden compared workers who took the probiotic bacteria Lactobacillus reuteri every day with those who didn't. The workers who took the probiotic had less than half the sick leave of workers who didn't. The newly published study from Sweden included 181 factory workers who consumed a drink containing L. reuteri or a drink without the probiotic for 80 days. Twenty-three of the 87 workers in the placebo group reported taking sick days during the study, compared with only 10 of the 94 workers who took the L. reuteri. The difference was most dramatic among 53 shift workers: none of the 26 shift workers in the L. reuteri group reported taking any sick leave, compared with nine out of 27 shift workers in the placebo group.

According to the Centers for Disease Control, doctors are writing 50 million unnecessary prescriptions for ailments that cannot be treated with antibiotics, such as the common cold and other viral infections. It is estimated that 80% of ear infections do not require antibiotic therapy, and that over 178,000 people are affected by "bad bacteria" after antibiotic therapy. Replacing beneficial bacteria through supplementation, especially after antibiotic use, can reestablish the good bacteria and help boost the immune system. Probiotics and proper nutrition is a terrific one-two punch against the cold and flu and overall body health.

Nebraska Cultures, leading the probiotic industry for the past 25 years, is reinforcing their commitment to consumer education when it comes to probiotics and their use during antibiotic therapy.

The recently released book by Dr. Khem Shahani, Cultivate Health from Within: Dr. Shahani’s Guide to Probiotics, states, "It has been known for nearly a century that eating fermented foods containing ‘friendly bacteria’ has important nutritional and therapeutic benefits in proper friendly bacteria balance… proper balance of friendly bacteria is not an easy feat to accomplish. Diets rich in sugar, cortisone and cortisone-like drugs, birth control pills, immuno-suppressive drugs and antibiotics have been major culprits in affecting a naturally healthy digestive system and overall body health."

That’s precisely the reason Dr. Shahani wrote Cultivate Health From Within. He sensibly describes which probiotics are instrumental in achieving and maintaining the body’s health. Dr. Shahani’s® DDS-1 strain of L. acidophilus and other probiotics greatly help the body in healing and maintaining good health now and always.

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Angelica Jones
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