Choosing the Global Brand - International Trademark Association

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John P. Hoeppner, President of NameQuest, Inc. was the lead speaker in the March 6-7, INTA (International Trademark Association) Strategy Forum at the InterContinental-The Barclays in New York City. The “Choosing the Global Brand” panel included Unilever corporate counsel Eric W. McCormick and Susan B. Montgomery form the Boston law firm Foley Hoag LLP was moderated by Brendan J. O’Rourke a trademark attorney with the New York firm Proskauer Rose LLP.

John P. Hoeppner, President of NameQuest, Inc. was the lead speaker in the March 6-7, INTA (International Trademark Association) Strategy Forum at the InterContinental-The Barclays in New York City. The “Choosing the Global Brand” panel included Unilever corporate counsel Eric W. McCormick and Susan B. Montgomery form the Boston law firm Foley Hoag LLP was moderated by Brendan J. O’Rourke a trademark attorney with the New York firm Proskauer Rose LLP.

Hoeppner provided the audience with a “Verbal Brand Naming Specialist View.” Hoeppner began by stressing the communication disruption caused by dawn of the Internet age. Hoeppner stated, “Brands are no longer bound by geographical borders; the Internet has made all brands global. An eBay shopper in Paris, France, sees basically the same screen as someone logging in from Paris, Texas, only the language is different.”

The value of global brands was a part of the discussion with a recent Business Week – Interbrand analysis cited. The top-ten most valuable global brands are Coca-Cola valued at $67-Billion, Microsoft $59-Billion, IBM $53-Billion, GE $46-Billion, INTEL $35-Billion, Nokia $26-Billion, Disney $26-Billion, McDonald’s $26-Billion, Toyota $24-Billion and Marlboro $21-Billion. The most valuable “Non-US” Brands (not in top 10) are Mercedes-Benz, BMW, Louis Vuitton, Honda and Samsung. Hoeppner noted the most interesting group is the new emerging brand category. These brands have created significant global value using little if any traditional media advertising. The new generation brands include Google $8-Billion, eBay, $6-Billion, Yahoo $5-Billion, Amazon.com $4-Billion and Starbucks $2-Billion.

More than 200 trademark and IP (intellectual property) attorneys from the America’s, Europe, Asia and Australia attended the two day event.

“The goal of effective verbal brand naming is to choose a product name that reflects and

fits the customer’s needs so precisely that the name sells the product.”™

  • John P. Hoeppner, President – NameQuest, Inc.

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