Helping Young Brains Learn To Read More Easily With Multi-sensory Handwriting; Specialist Offers Free Lecture on March 18

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Using handwriting movement exercises and therapeutic music helps children train the brain, i.e., develop impulse control, so they can focus. Its non-threatening format stimulates the brain and helps them learn to read more easily. Joining other specialists world around the world honoring Brain Awareness Week, March 13-19, Jeanette Farmer is offering a free lecture March 18 at Denver's Ross-University Hill library on multi- sensory handwriting's influence on the brain.

Can reviving good old fashioned penmanship exercises avoid creating learning disabilities? Jeanette Farmer, one of only a few handwriting remediation specialists in America, claims, "It certainly can! Handwriting is brainwriting! Poor handwriting affects the ability to learn. I revived the old Palmer movement exercises and added therapeutic music. The music is the magic! Movement via the hand creates intense neural activity that activates the left brain, home of the language capacities. Movement 'fires' the neurons with each change of direction, stimulating the entire brain. Quite simply, it 'trains the brain.' By dampening the emotional brain, it develops impulse control while priming it for the reading process. More importantly, extensive brain research supports this concept's effectiveness."

Armed with the European perspective of handwriting and its physiological/psychological link in the brain and supporting brain research, Farmer lectures nationally and internationally about multi-sensory handwriting's capacity to "train the brain." Joining other specialists world around the world honoring Brain Awareness Week, March 13-19, she offers a free lecture March 18 at Denver's Ross-University Hill library on multi- sensory handwriting's influence on the brain.

Explaining its deeper effects, she notes, "Because it involves the hand, nothing else done in the classroom can begin to compare with the powerful, irreplaceable influence that the rhythmic, repetitive manipulation of the thumb and fingers has on the young brain over time. However, educators aren't trained in penmanship today, so they're unaware that the regulated stimulation it provides impacts the learning process. The subject has been grossly neglected for decades. Depriving the brain of essential stimulation leaves it unprepared to do the hard work in learning to read. Since television stimulates the right brain and not the left, the brain can't perform as needed. At-risk students need handwriting's regulated stimulation to avoid a potential slide into learning disabilities."

Research indicates that TV, being image-based, causes a delay in developmental readiness for ever increa- sing numbers of children. This negatively impacts the learning process. She notes that America has had a 42% increase in the need for special education services in the last 15 years. Many children struggle today in trying to learn to read. Declining reading scores over the last 30-40 years has spawned the derogatory term, 'The Dumbing Down Of America.' She reports, "While children love to do the exercises, teachers rave about the wave of calm that sweeps across the classroom as they focus so intently." Several thousand American and Canadian teachers and parents have used it over the last ten years.

Calling multi-sensory handwriting is a simple but powerful gift to the brain. she indicates it gives children a head start on being smart. Its powerful influence on the brain is distinct--the mind is what the brain does. While all children benefit, those with learning disabilities, ADHD/ADD, special needs--autism, Down's syndrome, brain injury, etc., benefit significantly. For information, call 303-740-6161; or her web page at http://www.retrainthebrain. com.

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Jeanette Farmer

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