4 Ways to Handle the Primary Cause of Conflict during an Estate Settlement

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Behind many obituaries is a family fighting over mom’s china, dad's fishing gear, or family memorabilia - items not usually covered in a will. Angie Epting Morris, author of "The Settlement Game: How to Settle an Estate Peacefully and Fairly," reveals how to get what you want from the family estate, while remaining friends with family members.

Behind many obituaries is a family fighting over mom's china, dad's fishing gear, or other items not usually covered in a will. When a family member dies, it is common to wonder what will be passed down, and to whom. It is also common, unfortunately, for this to cause ferocious fights between family members.

“Despite how much kissin' cousins love one another, the reason they fail to get along is not because they argue over the items being handed down,” says Angie Epting Morris, author of The Settlement Game: How to Settle an Estate Peacefully and Fairly (Voyages Press, Inc.,

TheSettlementGame.com ). “Sometimes they don't realize how important it is to talk to one another in a way that gets each person what they want.”

From “The Settlement Game” here is a brief outline of four personality types, along with tips for communicating more effectively with each style:

1. The Dominant Style - Outgoing and task-oriented, thinks in terms of “What” questions. When working with them to settle an estate, get to the point. To communicate with them, be brief, specific and confident.

2. The Inspiring Style - Outgoing yet people-oriented, thinks in terms of “Who” questions. When settling an estate with this type, keep a friendly environment. Turn talk into action and focus on their accomplishments. They may need to be gently steered back to business.

3. The Supportive Style - Reserved and people-oriented, thinks in terms of “How” questions. To communicate with this person, be agreeable and non-threatening. Give them time to adjust to changes. Be sincere and do not rush them.

4. The Cautious Style - Reserved and task-oriented, thinks in terms of “Why” questions. Give them the facts, avoid being emotional and patiently welcome their questions.

Relationships are the most precious possessions, says Morris. When heirs understand each other and the way each individual makes decisions, all involved in the estate are more likely to be satisfied with the settlement.

Find the free report “3 Causes of Conflict in an Estate Settlement and What to do About Them” at TheSettlementGame.com.

BIO:

Angie Epting Morris, creator of “The Settlement Game”

Angie Epting Morris grew up hearing stories from her father, an attorney, of how families interacted when dividing up the valuables of the deceased. Faced with settling the estate of her parents, she became her own story, with a happy ending. Settling the estate, Morris and her

siblings became better friends.

Angie received her Bachelor of Science degree from the University of Georgia and was a professional cartographer for the Department of Agriculture. She taught high school English and geography, then opened Morris Travel agency in Augusta. She and her husband Carter split their time between the Augusta area and Big Canoe, Georgia. They

have two grown sons, Hunter and Taylor.

The Settlement Game: How to Settle an Estate Peacefully and Fairly

Voyages Press, Inc.

2006

ISBN: 0-9769934-2-2

$14.95

TheSettlementGame.com

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Angie Morris