Bird Flu Virus is One Mutation Away from Airborne; Time to Stockpile Supplies to Prepare for Major Global Catastrophe

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An airborne strain of the H5N1 virus would have the ability to spread across the globe in mere days.

Leading researchers have indicated that the bird flu virus is now just one mutation away from changing into a form that can be easily transmitted among humans. Once the virus mutates into an airborne form, there may be very little warning that a pandemic has begun. An airborne strain of the H5N1 virus would have the ability to spread across the globe in mere days.

Some experts feel that this new super-influenza strain could transform the world into a situation resembling the New Orleans catastrophe after the Katrina hurricane. All deliveries to stores, restaurants and gas stations would immediately cease because people would either be too sick or too scared to attend their jobs. This would cause huge shortages in a matter of days.    

The best way to survive a Bird Flu pandemic would be to minimize contact with other people. This would require people to stay in their homes for an extended period of time. Without adequate food and water, this can not be accomplished. In addition, if people wait too long before they begin buying extra supplies they may find that there are no supplies left once the pandemic begins.

If you would like more information on how to immediately prepare, there is a pandemic flu website that provides live help in answering your questions. This website has various different discussion forums designed to provide real time answers to your questions. Whether you would like the latest news on the quickly unfolding developments, or if you would like help in preparing, we recommend that you immediately visit this site at: http://www.Avianflutalk.com.

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