The 2006 Job Outlook for Teens: More Jobs Open but Preparation and Attitude are Key for Teens to Land a Job, Says Teens4Hire.org

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A stronger economy means the potential job market for teens is the strongest it's been in six years. However, that doesn't mean employers will welcome them with open arms, according to Teens4Hire.org, a web site devoted to those looking to recruit young adults in the high school and college age group.

A stronger economy means the potential job market for teens is the strongest it's been in six years. However, that doesn't mean employers will welcome them with open arms, according to Teens4Hire.org, a web site devoted to those looking to recruit young adults in the high school and college age group.

"Companies still tell us that they'd prefer to hire older workers (if they can find them) instead of teens, says Renée Ward, founder of Teens4Hire.org. "Companies prefer the work ethic and experience that an older person can bring and feel teens are not prepared for work, lack basic knowledge skills, are unreliable, and have bad attitudes."

This comes at a time when industries with greater activity in the spring and summer -- such as hospitality, travel, tourism, amusement/entertainment, retail, parks and recreation and construction plan to increase hiring compared to last year, Ward says.

And while most employers do not advertise their openings directly to teens, they may have openings teens could fill.

Teens seeking jobs will have to overcome these negative perceptions by preparing and demonstrating that they are ready and willing to work. Here’s how according to Teens4Hire.org:

  •      Learn and master basic English and math skills.
  •      Learn how to follow directions.
  •      Learn how to give each task you are assigned your very best.
  •      Learn how to complete assignments on time every time.
  •      Learn how to interact with others in a respectful manner.
  •      Learn how to dress appropriately for work.
  •      Learn how to complete job applications neatly and completely.
  •      Learn how to communicate and demonstrate your mastery of the above to a potential employer during the interview.

Ward says, ”Regardless of your age, if you want a paying job you must show a potential employer that you have the basic education required to do the job, are willing to work and learn, have a positive attitude, can and will follow directions, are reliable, and understand the needs of the business.”

Employers wanting to know more about recruiting and integrating ambitious teens into your workforce should contact http://www.teens4hire.org.

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Renee Ward

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