Cuff Calipers, Protecting Police From Civil Liability

In November, 2003 a jury found the Los Angeles Police Department liable to pay an award of $33 million dollars for “police inflicted injuries” due to improperly applied handcuffs. Now law enforcement officials can breathe a sigh of relief. At Tactical Police Supply, police agencies can find a new product designed by the Utah based company, “Cuff Calipers.” A new handcuff-calibration device has been designed in order to combat against the ever increasing claims of “police brutality” through allegations of tightened handcuffs.

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West Point, Utah (PRWEB) April 2, 2006

Police officers use handcuffs to detain people several times per week. Many officers say that the majority of these people will complain to them the handcuffs are too tight. Officers are often asked to loosen them, even if they aren’t too tight. There has never been an official way to document the actual locking position of the handcuffs. Unfortunately the combination of this complaint, coupled with the lack of ability to document the tightness of the handcuffs has proved to be very costly to many police agencies.

In November, 2003 a jury found the Los Angeles Police Department liable to pay an award of $33 million dollars for “police inflicted injuries” due to improperly applied handcuffs. Many police departments have spent several million dollars to settle a handcuffing lawsuit, or have lost by court ruling. These lawsuits focus on the officers failure to protect the detainee from “Handcuff Neuropathy.”

Handcuff Neuropathy may cause the victim to complain of pain around the thumb while tight handcuffs are in place. The pain will likely decrease when the handcuffs are removed, but there is a residual or decreased sensation over the radial side of the thumb. It is becoming more common that detainees are seeking medical attention to document this as evidence of “police brutality,” even if this effect is a product of their own struggling.

Cuff Calipers designed as an answer to document exact position of handcuffs:

Now law enforcement officials can breathe a sigh of relief. At http://www.TacticalPoliceSupply.com police agencies can find a new product designed by the Utah based company, “Cuff Calipers.” A new handcuff-calibration device has been designed in order to combat against the ever increasing claims of “police brutality” through allegations of tightened handcuffs.

After extensive research, over 200 handcuff-related lawsuits have been documented that were filed against police agencies throughout the nation.

Using a laser etched calibration system, “Cuff Calipers” have been designed to enable police to document the exact position or diameter of the handcuffs. In turn, the size of the cuffs can easily be re-created for civil or criminal litigation in order to provide evidence of the actual position the handcuffs were applied and double-locked.

It is recommended that the handcuff position is documented both at the time the handcuffs are applied and double-locked, as well as the time the handcuffs are removed. Policies should be written within agencies to require these standards; the combination of consistent use and documentation will effectively provide useful information to present in the event of any litigation. Strict adherence to these policies should establish reliable and effective arguments to the courts.

Through http://www.TacticalPoliceSupply.com Police agencies can have the calibration device engraved on their existing handcuffs for about $15.00 a pair or buy new handcuffs with the markings already on them from between the estimated cost of $26.00 to $50.00 a pair, depending on the model purchased. Four major brands are carried including ASP, Hiatt-Thompson, Peerless, and Smith & Wesson.

Recently, fifteen police agencies in Utah have completely switched and committed to this new system. There are still many more considering it, including the Utah Highway Patrol, who have placed some models with specialized squads for testing and evaluation.

"We hope to avoid any problems," said Clinton Police Chief Bill Chilson. “That's what it's for -- liability. In the long run, it will be a great benefit."

"I think it will help us avoid any unjustified claims and will help the officers to pay close attention to how they are applying the handcuffs," said Centerville Police Lt. Paul Child. The Centerville Police Department ordered 50 handcuffs with the new design and expects to be using them soon, Child said.

For more information, you may contact Eric Braegger from Tactical Police Supply, by calling 801-690-1439.

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Contact

Attachments

"Cuff Calipers" @ www.TacticalPoliceSupply.com "Cuff Calipers" @ www.TacticalPoliceSupply.com

Cuff Calipers are lasered etched into the handcuffs to provide a device to record settings.


Injury induced through struggling. Injury induced through struggling.

People who struggle can induce their own injury which can lead a jury to believe the handcuffs were too tight.