Montana Cowboy Applies Business Experience To Career in Country Music

Singing onstage to thousands of screaming fans is a common daydream to people all over the world. To some, it is a quintessential American Dream. The mind-numbing popularity of American Idol is a testament to our love affair with the music industry. Literally thousands of wannabe singers show up at tryouts for the show, with the vast majority going home disappointed. Record labels receive hundreds of unsolicited submissions every week from artists who are desperate to have their music heard by the masses. Many wonder if it’s even possible to succeed these days without major label support. Can you find success on your own as a musical artist?

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Clearwater, FL (PRWEB) April 2, 2006

Singing on stage to thousands of screaming fans is a common daydream to people all over the world. To some, it is a quintessential American Dream. The mind-numbing popularity of American Idol is a testament to our love affair with the music industry. Literally thousands of wannabe singers show up at tryouts for the show, with the vast majority going home disappointed. Record labels receive hundreds of unsolicited submissions every week from artists who are desperate to have their music heard by the masses. Many wonder if it’s even possible to succeed these days without major label support. Can you find success on your own as a musical artist?

Since the day he first heard Elvis Presley, Mitchell John wanted to be an entertainer. After years of dreaming about it, John, at the age of 33, decided to take matters into his own hands. Through years of hard work and perseverance, John has finally realized his dream and become an accomplished country artist. However, his path to success initially took him into other directions.

John first found success as a small businessman. He took a small business selling sports hats and turned it into a profitable franchise. After selling his stake in that business, he got involved with plastics. When he decided to try his hand at country music, he applied many of the lessons learned from business to the world of music.

“After many years working as a successful businessman, I knew that if I were ever going to take a serious shot at the music business, this is the time,” says John. “I was 33 and could no longer deny a lifelong desire to record and tour as a singer and entertainer.”

Instead of going the traditional route through Nashville, John, a self-proclaimed Montana cowboy through and through, decided to thumb his nose at the establishment and do it all on his own as an independent artist, without the aid of a major record or distribution company. “When you are an independent, it’s a bigger challenge and a better adventure when you’re the one who makes the decision and then has to make it work,” says John. “If you’ve been smart, worked hard, and gotten lucky, profits are all yours, too.”

As an independent artist, John has performed hundreds of shows, published an autobiography, and released six albums, including his latest live set Live at the Alberta Bair Theater. He has sold almost 100,000 records to date and is one of the most successful independent country artists working today.

John credits faith, hard-work, and perseverance as keys to his success. His inspiring success story in the music business proves that small businesses---and that includes independent musicians---can indeed make it work. “The American Dream is alive and well for private entrepreneurs who are willing to learn the hard lessons of the business of making money, and willing to work and sacrifice long and hard to be successful in business,” says John.

Commemorating ten years as an independent performing songwriter and businessman, John wrote Funded by Faith: An American Dream (Ta Tanka Publishing, 2006). John’s book is a compelling memoir of an individual who used his experience and proven success in small business and applied it to his desire to be a successful country artist. Regardless of whether you want to sell CDs or ice cream cones, his book offers readers a how-to-make-it-on-your-own guide to success.

“I just want others to understand that it is within their power to take a dream from inside their hearts and begin making it their life’s work,” says John. “I’ve been fortunate enough to realize my dream and I hope that my story can help others do the same.”

For a review copy of the book or to set up an interview with Mitchell John for a story, please contact Sarah Van Blaricum at 727-443-7115, ext. 207

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