Blue Ray Technologies Chooses RFID as Anti-Theft Standard -- Controversy Over $50 Billion Piracy Racket Settled for U.S. Manufacturer

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High-definition disc manufacturer Blue Ray Technologies is announcing that the new anti-theft standard for its super quality HD DVD format will be an equally futuristic system, RFID. Competing anti-theft systems, designed to combat the $50 billion a year disc theft racket, have been a controversial topic since CDs first came out.

High-definition disc manufacturer Blue Ray Technologies is announcing that the new anti-theft standard for its super quality HD DVD format will be an equally futuristic system, RFID.

Competing anti-theft systems, designed to combat the $50 billion a year disc theft racket, have been a controversial topic since CDs first came out. Record labels then DVD makers chose the sensomatic strips -- now hidden in the jewel box to set off the alarm from unpaid discs at retailer’s door gates. The problem is that thieves are now stealing just the unprotected disc.

DVD pioneer and Blue Ray Technologies Inc. founder Erick Hansen says, "RFID has the ability to be placed right on the disc itself. It will transmit much more as well. It can also tell retailers when and from what store it was purchased, as well as where and when it was manufactured and shipped."

Where the disc was made is key to tracking down the piracy that occurs at the often-overseas facilities that are suspected of making legit discs for studios by day and fakes by night.

"RFID will definitely not interfere with the movie or sound in any way," assured Hansen. "Blu-ray will change the future of the industry, not only in quality of picture and sound, but in anti-piracy – thus returning the dollars to artists and content holders as well."

Another reason Hansen’s Blue Ray Technologies facility is especially important is it is apparently the only U.S.-based independent manufacturer planning Blu-ray (the generic spelling) facilities.

Overseas plants may be backed up for years as major film studios will be converting their own extensive catalogues, as well as creating Hi-Def disks for new releases -- and their facilities might be unable to accommodate either independent film companies or even mini majors.

Until now Hi-Def has only been available to cable and dish subscribers due to the huge amounts of memory needed. There is also a format war with Blu-ray (the generic spelling with 80 gigabytes per disk) and, perhaps transitional HD disc format, called HD-DVD (50 gigs), and Blu-ray appears to have a clear advantage.

Top movie and TV conglomerates Sony, Warner Bros., Disney, Fox and others support the format, according to the Blu-Ray Disc Association, as do many of the top hardware manufacturers.

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Jeffrey Jolson
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