Help For Easter Chocoholics Available Says Clinical Hypnotherapist Linda Bright From Mind Over Matter

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Overeating chocolate is a learned response, a habit or a coping mechanism that can be changed and a guilt-free Easter is possible even when surrounded by chocolate temptations according to Clinical Hypnotherapist Linda Bright From Mind Over Matter.

Overeating chocolate is a learned response, a habit or a coping mechanism that can be changed and a guilt-free Easter is possible even when surrounded by chocolate temptations according to Clinical Hypnotherapist, Linda Bright.

Chocolate is an international symbol of luxury and self-indulgence and in Australia annual sales are in excess of $900 million in gourmet chocolate alone.

“Chocolate is an anti-depressant because it contains phenylethylamine or PEA which is also found in the brain. We release PEA in very tiny amounts when we are feeling elated and physically stimulated,” said Ms Bright who is the founder and director of Mind Over Matter, a Perth-based hypnotherapy consulting practice.

For some of us chocolate is an enjoyable treat, an infrequent or irregular indulgence and Easter is a great pretext to spoil ourselves a little.

But for others it is a source of guilt or regret or frustration because they find eating chocolate compulsive. For those who crave chocolate Easter time is fraught with danger and temptation.

“They wish they didn’t need chocolate but, even if they could, they wouldn’t stop eating it. It would be like walking away from a friend. There would be a gap in their lives. Something essential would be missing. And if they had to do without chocolate they know they would have feelings of resentment and deprivation,” Ms Bright said.

Addictions, even chocolate addictions, are only a problem if we are suffering in some way financially or physically or emotionally. If we are not suffering -- or causing others to suffer as a consequence of our addiction -- then our addictions are acceptable.

But chocolate can be enjoyed in moderation. The challenge is how?

“It is a matter of addressing what the need is that chocolate fills for each individual and by using our subconscious mind to address that need and find alternatives for us, healthier alternatives for example,” Ms Bright said.

“If you want change to happen you have to change what you happen to do,” she said.

Are You A Chocoholic? Take Our Quiz

1    Do you feel compelled to buy chocolate every time you are in a supermarket/petrol station?

Never        0     1     2     3    4     5         Every time

2    Once you start to eat chocolate, do you find it difficult or impossible to stop?

Never         0     1     2     3    4     5             Always

3    Have others in your family displayed addictive behaviours? (eg Smoking, working, over/under eating)

No         0     1     2     3    4     5             More than 1

4    Do you hide your chocolate eating from others?

Never        0     1     2     3    4     5             Always

5    Have you ever bought chocolate as a gift for a friend or family member and eaten it yourself?

Never        0     1     2     3    4     5             Every time

How Did You Score?

Double your score for Questions 2 and 4.

0 – 10    You’re OK. You enjoy your chocolate, but it’s under control.

11 – 20    It’s a worry to you. You may be a binge eater or bothered about your weight, but it’s not serious unless you have a health issue such as diabetes.

21 – 30    Hmmm. It’s time to do something about it. Your chocolate habit may be creating a troublesome weight or emotional issue.

31 – 35    Chocolate is taking over your life. Do something now.

Linda Bright is a qualified, registered and certified Clinical Hypnotherapist and Emotional Freedom Technique Practitioner.

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