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Universal Studios Japan™ was the first and, to date, only theme park to open ahead of schedule and under budget. This is the story of how that feat was accomplished. The authors' debut effort, published by iUniverse, Inc., is their first-hand account of the events and people who made it happen.

Universal Studios Japan™ was the first and, to date, only theme park to open ahead of schedule and under budget. This is the story of how that feat was accomplished. The authors' debut effort, published by iUniverse, Inc., is their first-hand account of the events and people who made it happen. 31 Months in Japan - the Building of a Theme Park combines interesting details and behind-the-scenes descriptions of how magic is made in the entertainment industry with the challenges and frustrations of adapting to a foreign lifestyle. After spending nearly three years in Japan during the construction of the Universal Studios® theme park in Osaka, authors Larry K. and Lorna Collins share the funny, frustrating, touching and sometimes difficult events of that experience.

What NOT to do when in Japan:
1) Keeping shoes on while indoors. In nearly every home and many business, shoes are removed at the entrance and slippers are provided.
2) Wear toilet slippers elsewhere in the house. Special slippers are available just for use in the toilet room. Don't make the mistake of wearing them elsewhere.
3) Blow your nose in public. Even though small packages of tissues are handed out in train stations, they are Not for blowing noses. They are for wiping sweat and drying hands. Sniff, snort or mouth breathe, but don't blow!
4) Pick your teeth with your mouth open. Toothpicks are provided in nearly all restaurants, but it is considered impolite to use them unless you cover your mouth with one hand and clean your teeth with the other.
5) Forget to bow. The art of bowing when meeting or leaving is a skill to master. You will be forgiven for bowing too low or not low enough, but you will be considered uncultured if you don't bow at all.
6) Forget to exchange business cards. If you are doing business with the Japanese, the formal exchange of meishi or business cards is an important part of every introduction. Hand yours to your counterpart with the writing facing them. And bow.
7) Pour your own drink. It is customary to let someone else pour your drink. And you must remember to take your turn pouring theirs.
8) Refuse to take part in the karaoke. Everyone does it, whether they can carry a tune or not. And you are expected to as well.
9) Refuse the alcohol. All business parties feature drinking. Develop an "allergy" if need be, but outright refusal is considered bad form.
10) Fail to attend a social occasion with business associates. You only have to stay for a few minutes and greet the most important people (the bosses) but you must make an appearance.

31 Months in Japan: The Building of a Theme Park is an inside look at the Japanese culture.

Authors Larry K. and Lorna Collins have developed a website, http://members.cox.net/31months, where you can learn more about this fascinating book.

Larry K. Collins was a Project Engineer and his wife, Lorna, was in Document Control while working on Universal Studios Japan in Osaka. They began dating in high school and have been married over forty years. They have returned to their home in Dana Point, CA where Larry enjoys surfing as often as he can.

To get more information, or to arrange an interview with experts on Japan and theme parks Larry and Lorna Collins, call 949-240-3477, cell phone 949-633-1370 or 949-633-1381 or email 31months @ cox.net

Contact: Lorna Collins
Phone: 949-240-3477
Cell: 949-633-1370
25441 Neptune Drive Dana Point, CA 92629

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