Industrial Processing Waste -- The Hidden Cost That's Not So Hidden Anymore

Share Article

Cost is a significant issue when it comes to the selection of an industrial filtration system. Historically, the choice has been between higher operating costs vs a higher capital equipment investment. Or otherwise stated, it is between a short-term investment and a long-term investment. In engineering design terms, the choice is between bag or cartridge filters vs self-cleaning filters.

Cost is a significant issue when it comes to the selection of an industrial filtration system. Historically, the choice has been between higher operating costs vs a higher capital equipment investment. Or otherwise stated, it is between a short-term investment and a long-term investment. In engineering design terms, the choice is between bag or cartridge filters vs self-cleaning filters.

However, due to the new environmental regulations--and the costs associated with waste disposal--this will change significantly over the next five years. Most importantly, this is in all industries, so be prepared.

For many applications, the use of disposable bags or cartridges is the filtration method of choice. Why? Because the elements are relatively inexpensive to buy, and thought of as convenient to use.

The biggest problem with short-term investment--otherwise known as bags or cartridge filters--is that they have to be disposed of. Depending on the laws and nature of the waste, the cost of the disposal can be exorbitant.

Bags and cartridges hidden costs:

  • Amount of product lost with the waste stream
  • Down-time for bag change out
  • Hazardous waste disposal charges
  • Additional safety equipment for employees

One of the advantages of a capital equipment investment (self-cleaning filters) is that the automation can be set to clean on a pre-determined schedule, or clean on demand when necessary.

How they work:

Self-cleaning filters are controlled by the pressure differential between inlet and outlet headers as contaminants collects on the filter screens. The screens automatically clean themselves when the pressure reaches a predetermined level.

In addition, this can assist when the waste is isolated and then recycled for several more uses; or when the waste is sold to another company for their use. Due to the nature of disposable bags and cartridges, recycle-ability is not an option.

The new self-cleaning filters on the market today can now filter from 1/4" down to 15 microns, and the costs have come down significantly.

IMPORTANT: When tighter retentions are required, don't discount using the self-cleaning filter as a pre-filter ahead of the bag/cartridge system.

While the move over to the other side can be intimidating, it is worth investigating. You might be pleasantly surprised...

by Ask Filter Man

For questions about industrial filtration, please visit the Ask Filter Man forum at http://www.ronningen-petter.com/Ask-Filter-Man-Blog.asp.

If you would like to discuss this filtration solution with one of our highly-trained Applications Specialists, please Contact us at http://www.ronningen-petter.com/ContactUs/Contact-Us.asp.

If you need more convincing, here is additional data that supports the move from disposable media to self-cleaning media. Note: while this example pertains to the fine chemicals market, the same logic can be applied to most markets:

HIDDEN COSTS

To begin, there's the ongoing disposable filter purchase price, which typically runs at least $3 per bag or cartridge per day, plus the ongoing cost of waste disposal.

For non-hazardous waste, disposal is already $400-$800 USD per drum, while that of hazardous waste is approaching $1,000 per drum.

It's not unusual for the typical pharmaceutical company or other fine-chemical based manufacturer to produce up to 20 drums per year of filter media for disposal, not counting the cost of treating or eliminating any run-off process fluids.

Beyond this, there are significant labor costs involved with transporting, handling and storing disposable filter media, as well as with replacing it.

EXAMPLE

For just a small 30-gpm cartridge filter with six 10-inch cartridges, the operator must:

  • Remove 16 separate parts including the cover, compression seals, cartridges, and seal plates.
  • The operator must reassemble all 16 parts with proper alignment to ensure good seals.
  • Then someone must haul away the spent filter media.
  • There's also a housekeeping cost for cleaning any spillage from disposable media, along with increased emissions, safety risk, and liability.
  • Then there's the potential cost of disposable media rupturing or overflowing (as bags sometimes do), contaminating product or machinery downstream and slowing production.
  • Finally, add the cost of buying, maintaining, and cleaning workers' protective clothing for replacing disposable media. As well as the extra time and labor required to fill out MSDS forms and other paperwork required for items hauled to landfills or incinerators.

SOLUTION

Introducing the MCF Magnetically Coupled Filter and the DCF Self-Cleaning Filter.

Would you like to hear about a filter that can clean in place, and remove your environmental and employee exposure to hazardous materials concerns?

Contact us if you would like to learn more about our Self-Cleaning Technology at http://www.ronningen-petter.com/ContactUs/Contact-Us.asp.

-- by Ask Filter Man

###

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Linda Stacy
Visit website