Da Vinci Fatigue?

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With the movie version of “The Da Vinci Code” set to open May 19th, frankly some of us have Da Vinci fatigue. What better time for some fun in parody than now? Humor is good for all of us! Introducing "The BaLoney Code," a parody written by Davis Sweet. “An expert and hilarious job of terminal surgery.” says Tony Hendra, founding editor of National Lampoon. This is not another ticked-off Catholic book debunking "The Da Vinci Code." It's just full-on irreverent humor, like "Blazing Saddles" or Monty Python.

More Mirth of a Nation

With the movie version of “The Da Vinci Code” set to open May 19th, frankly some of us have Da Vinci fatigue. What better time for some fun in parody than now? For all his court-affirmed inventiveness, the author of “The Da Vinci Code”, Dan Brown, has a style that is so breathless and melodramatic it's practically impossible not to lampoon. Introducing "The BaLoney Code," a book written by Davis Sweet. At just 134 pages, this book is a perfect light read for the airplane or an afternoon at the beach.

People get confused over the title, thinking it's another ticked-off Catholic book debunking "The Da Vinci Code." It's not. It's just full-on irreverent humor, like Spike Milligan or "Blazing Saddles" or Monty Python. And like those, "The BaLoney Code" is solidly adult in its language and outlook. If you liked the movies “Airplane” or “The Naked Gun” then you’ll love "The BaLoney Code."

“An expert and hilarious job of terminal surgery.” says Tony Hendra, founding editor of National Lampoon.

“His skillful Da Vinci Code satire is a demented funhouse that takes you on an adventure that parallels the original book's blow by blow account of the search for the Holy Grail. Sweet is a gifted satirist who frequently made my sides ache with laughter as I devoured his Baloney” ~ Mike Hayes, managing editor at BustedHalo.com

About the author: Davis Sweet writes humor and political satire in Oregon. He edits The Bean Magazine, online at beanmag.com, and writes satire and commentary for The Huffington Post. His humor has appeared in three HarperCollins humor collections, "More Mirth of a Nation," "May Contain Nuts," and "101 Damnations." He has also written serious essays for The Village Voice. He's currently working on a comic novel about total life makeovers. Mr. Sweet has had Multiple Sclerosis for the past eight years, making it harder for him to pick up a book and read than before. As a result, he is now an audio book nut, and went all-out to make sure his audio book quality would impress any fan of the genre.

What's the difference between a parody and a satire? According to Oxford, a parody is the imitation of the style of a particular writer with deliberate exaggeration for comic effect; while a satire is the use of humor and exaggeration to expose and criticize stupidity and vices. Davis Sweet's new book The Baloney Code is a parody with satirical spice.

The audio book is read by Amy Lynn Gray, a Portland actor and puppeteer with the Tears of Joy Theatre.

True to its Oregonian roots, The Bean is an environmentally conscious publisher opting for earth-friendly printing and distribution routes. The paperback version of the book is intentionally print-on-demand; the audio version is intentionally exclusive to Audible.com.

Retails for $10.95 at http://www.amazon.com
The audio version is available exclusively at audible.com

More inspiration…

Why write about a parody?

  • Laughter lowers blood pressure. People who laugh heartily on a regular basis have lower standing blood pressure than the average person. When people have a good laugh, initially the blood pressure increases, but then it decreases to levels below normal.
  • Humor changes our biochemical state. Laughter decreases stress hormones and increases infection fighting antibodies. It increases our attentiveness, heart rate, and pulse.
  • Laughter protects the heart.
  • Laughter gives our bodies a good workout. It is estimated that hearty laughter can burn calories equivalent to several minutes on the rowing machine or the exercise bike.
  • Humor improves brain function and relieves stress. Laughter stimulates both sides of the brain to enhance learning. It eases muscle tension and psychological stress, which keeps the brain alert and allows people to retain more information.

Source for above: http://www.helpguide.org/life/humor_laughter_health.htm

“When we laugh, natural killer cells which destroy tumors and viruses increase, along with Gamma-interferon (a disease-fighting protein), T-cells (important for our immune system) and B-cells (which make disease-fighting antibodies). As well as lowering blood pressure, laughter increases oxygen in the blood, which also encourages healing.” "Science of Laughter” Discovery Health Website

“By the time a child reaches nursery school, he or she will laugh about 300 times a day. Adults laugh an average of 17 times a day.” “Science of Laughter” Discovery Health

A quote from the author regarding MS: “I have Multiple Sclerosis, so the printing is a little wobbly. That's a joke. The jokes in the book are much better than that, I promise. Having MS makes it harder for me to just pick up a book and read. I get tired, my vision gets wonky. I was already an audio book aficionado before I was diagnosed, but now audio is a necessity instead of just a diversion.” ~ Davis Sweet

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Kristina Wright
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