Obesity Greatly Increases Diabetes Risk

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The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently released a study confirming a direct correlation between the increasing numbers of Americans diagnosed with diabetes and their expanding waistlines. It has been long-known that clinical obesity carries with it myriad risk factors for many debilitating and life-threatening diseases, including heart disease, arthritis and type 2 diabetes.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently released a study confirming a direct correlation between the increasing numbers of Americans diagnosed with diabetes and their expanding waistlines. It has been long-known that clinical obesity carries with it myriad risk factors for many debilitating and life-threatening diseases, including heart disease, arthritis and type 2 diabetes. This study, however, is among the first to confirm that America’s obesity epidemic is a direct force behind the increasing numbers of type 2 diabetes diagnoses.

Type 2 diabetes, most often caused by excess weight and inactivity, is a condition in which insulin is not properly used to convert sugars and starches into energy for the human body. According to the American Diabetes Association, an estimated 20 million people in the United States have diabetes, 6.2 million of whom have yet to be diagnosed. Management of type 2 diabetes includes reducing stress, limiting alcohol intake, smoking cessation and weight loss.

According to the National Institutes of Health, about two-thirds of Americans are overweight or obese and have an increased risk for diabetes. Divided gastric bypass surgery is widely accepted as the most effective surgical weight-loss treatment available.

Considered the gold standard to alleviate severe obesity, the Roux-en-Y divided gastric bypass can be performed as an open or laparoscopic procedure. With either style, the stomach is divided into two sections. One of the two sections is a new, smaller pouch that will act as the new stomach. The new stomach has the capacity of roughly two ounces, as opposed to its former size of about two quarts. This drastic reduction limits the stomach’s ability to hold food, resulting in a feeling of fullness after eating only a small amount.

Surgeons at Pacific Bariatric Surgical Medical Group (http://www.pbsmg.com) have performed over 9,000 procedures on adult and adolescent patients at Scripps Mercy Hospital. As a result of outstanding aftercare programs and support groups, patients at Pacific Bariatric and Scripps Mercy Hospital see a slightly higher success rate than the national average.

Pacific Bariatric Surgical Medical Group and Scripps Mercy Hospital are nationally designated by the American Society for Bariatric Surgery as a Center of Excellence for bariatric surgery. Pacific Bariatric Surgical Medical Group, also known as Hillcrest Surgical Medical Group, Inc., has an 80-year tradition of surgical excellence and leadership in San Diego County. Scripps Mercy Hospital has been a health care leader in San Diego County for more than 115 years, offering patients an unparalleled continuum of care. For more information, visit http://www.pbsmg.com.

Established in 1890 by the Sisters of Mercy, Scripps Mercy Hospital serves the San Diego and Chula Vista communities. With 700 licensed beds, more than 3,000 employees and 1,300 physicians, Scripps Mercy Hospital is San Diego’s longest established and only Catholic medical center. With two campuses, Scripps Mercy Hospital is the largest hospital in San Diego County and one of the 10 largest in California. For more information, visit http://www.scripps.org/mercy.

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