June Issue of Archives of General Psychiatry Underscores Need for Anger & Rage Management as Demonstrated in Best Selling Anger Busting Workbook by James A.(Jim) Baker

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Results of a research study published in the June 2006 issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry serve to reinforce the urgent need for effective and widely available anger management training programs, according to James A. Baker, founder and director of the Anger Management Training Institute. “This research simply reinforces empirically what we experience anecdotally every day,” exclaimed Baker. “We are seeing an anger epidemic of almost tsunami type proportions sweeping across our culture.” http://www.Anger-Busting.com http://www.AngerManagementSeminar.com

We are making progress one day and one person at a time

Results of a research study published in the June 2006 issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry serve to reinforce the urgent need for effective and widely available anger management training programs, according to James A. Baker, founder and director of the Anger Management Training Institute LLC. Baker, who is the author of the highly claimed best selling Anger BustingTM Workbook, is a vocal advocate for anger management recovery programs.

“This research simply reinforces empirically what we experience anecdotally every day,” exclaimed Baker, whose anger management programs serve hundreds of clients around the country on a daily basis. “We are seeing an anger epidemic of almost tsunami type proportions sweeping across our culture, and the available resources in the fields of mental health, medicine, social services, criminal justice and the faith communities are woefully unprepared to deal with it. It is sobering and frightening.”

The study, conducted by researchers from Harvard University and the University of Chicago, and can be found in detail on http://www.Anger-Busting.com conducted personal interviews of 9,282 people over the age of 18 during a period from 2001-2003. The results of the survey turned up two particularly troubling problems. First of all, the study demonstrated that at least 5% of the total population of the US experience at least five rage events per year in which they physically assault someone, threaten serious bodily injury or destroy property. Termed by psychiatrists as Intermittent Explosive Disorder (IED), the high incidence of this behavior would make it more common in the general population than either schizophrenia or bi-polar disorder. IED could well be the driving force behind road rage, family violence, workplace violence and other destructive expressions of anger.

The other troubling aspect of this report is the conclusion that the prevalence of this condition is expanding rapidly in younger populations, with boys showing symptoms at an average age of 13 and girls becoming symptomatic by age 19. Researchers also concluded that IED is an excellent predictor of the onset of depression, alcoholism and drug abuse. While there is no clear explanation of this sudden upsurge in IED, researchers do believe that IED can be controlled or alleviated through a therapeutic regimen including both medication and cognitive therapy. Getting help is the key to getting well.

“Finally we have a conclusive nationwide study from a highly credible source that supports what I have been advocating for years,” declared Baker. “We have got to take anger seriously. We are seeing it develop into a stand-alone addiction that is totally baffling standard treatment methodologies. For years, anger has been treated as a secondary problem produced by underlying root causes. That approach is totally out of date now. Anger isn’t a symptom; it is a problem, and it is getting worse every day.”

The approach Baker advocates in the Anger BustingTM Workbook treats rage as an addiction, relying on a training program that is reminiscent of some of the basic concepts that fuel the 12-Step processes found in Alcoholics Anonymous and similar programs. Baker emphasizes that anger addicts -- rageaholics, as he refers to them -- can begin to experience significant and rapid improvement if they remain on the program and see it through.

“We get letters and emails daily from folks telling us that our program has changed their lives,” says Baker with obvious satisfaction beaming from his face. “Angry people are desperate people who really want help and just don’t know where to turn. They respond with real hope when we tell them that if they will do the work, they can get better. Most of them have already given up.”

The success of the workbook led Baker to create the Anger Management Training Institute, which offers both online and live training classes for clients who need help, as well as for those members of the helping community who are working with them to overcome their problem. Counselors and those in the social services can receive training to become a Certified Anger Resolution Therapist through Baker’s program, and deliver anger management services to their clients based on Baker’s unique system.

“We are making progress one day and one person at a time,” explained Baker. “But it is the struggle of a lifetime. I hope this new study builds a fire under people and motivates them to do something. If you are an anger addict, ask for help. If you are in a relationship with an anger addict, call and ask for help. We can help you change now, if you are willing to take the first step.”

For more information:

James A. Baker

Anger Management Training Institute LLC

713-627-7700

http://www.AngerManagementSeminar.com http://www.Anger-Busting.com

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