Surge in Laser Cutting Causes Suppliers to Scramble

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John Deere, CNH, Caterpillar and other large equipment manufacturers are now requiring suppliers to remove all oxides generated by laser cutting in order to prevent field paint failures. Chemical Methods’ laser scale removal chemistry allows suppliers to quickly meet this new challenge.

John Deere, CNH, Caterpillar and other large equipment manufacturers are now requiring suppliers to remove all oxides generated by laser cutting in order to prevent field paint failures. Chemical Methods’ laser scale removal chemistry allows suppliers to quickly meet this new challenge.

Increasingly metal cutting and forming job shops are using thermal forming operations such as laser cutting, flame cutting and plasma cutting that can result in the formation of a thin oxide layer on the metal. This oxide layer adheres loosely to the base metal interfering with paint adhesion. Any slight impact or abrasion leaves a bare edge open to corrosion. OEM’s such as John Deere, CNH and Caterpillar have labeled this condition as unacceptable.

“Quality conscious OEM’s have clearly communicated to their suppliers that oxide scale is unacceptable. They have had to deal with complaints from their customers related to paint chipping. Now they have gone back to their suppliers and said no more oxide scale will be tolerated if you want to continue to be one of our suppliers!” explains Thomas Rogers, Business Development Manager for Chemical Methods.

The removal of laser oxide scale can be accomplished by mechanical means such as paying workers to use grinding wheels or abrasive blasting, but they are expensive, inefficient, and don’t remove 100% of the scale. Using specialty chemicals in automated wash systems to remove laser oxide scale pays significant dividends in terms of efficiency, product quality, lower total product life cycle costs and increased profits.

“In addition to working with the suppliers to the OEM’s we are also working directly with these equipment manufacturers to address laser scale challenges that they have inside their own factories. They are getting their own houses in order and have told their suppliers to follow suit” said Tom Fabek, Vice President Sales & Marketing for Chemical Methods.

Now in its 35th year, Chemical Methods, Inc. is a leader in developing and marketing innovative specialty cleaners, surface treatment chemicals, metalworking fluids and corrosion inhibitors. The company is headquartered in Cleveland, Ohio. More information about the company and its capabilities is available at web site http://www.chemicalmethods.com or call 1-216-476-8400.

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Tom Fabek