The Bronx Library Center - New York City’s First LEED® Certified Public Building - Receives LEED® Silver Rating

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The Bronx Library Center, designed by Dattner Architects of New York City, received a LEED® (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Silver rating this week from the United States Green Building Council. The Bronx Library Center is the first branch of The New York Public Library to be LEED® certified and the first public building in New York City to receive LEED® certification.

The Bronx Library Center, designed by Dattner Architects, received a LEED® (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) Silver rating this week from the United States Green Building Council. The Bronx Library Center is the first branch of The New York Public Library to be LEED® certified and the first public building in New York City to receive LEED® certification.

The LEED® rating system measures building performance over a wide range of issues, from energy efficiency to environmentally friendly materials and air quality – seeking to make new built projects contribute positively to a “sustainable” environment.

Dattner Architects is currently developing the Green Design Guidelines for the New York City School Construction Authority in response to the recent enactment of Local Law 86 by the New York City Council, which will require New York City’s public projects to achieve a LEED® rating of Certified or Silver, or to achieve higher levels of environmental performance than city or state code requires.

Dattner Architects has been a leading proponent of sustainable design for more than a decade. Their design for the NYC Administration for Children’s Services Intake Center, which preceded LEED® certification, was a NYCDDC Sustainable Design Pilot Project. The project was profiled by NYSERDA.

Dattner Architects designed a distribution center in Switzerland for Estee Lauder Companies, Inc., designed to the highest level of Swiss sustainable design standards, including projecting glass sunshades to control entry of direct sunlight into the building and limit heat gain and a planted roof.

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Jennifer Greene
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