Free Ringtones Aren’t Always Free

Share Article

In a world filled with cell phones, ringtones that play songs from hiphop to classic or sounds odd serves the practical purpose of differentiating one phone’s ring from another. But, because of that uniqueness, they can also reflect the personality of the user.

It’s more than a phenomenon

Past News Releases

RSS

If anyone doubts the popularity of downloadable ringtones, ask the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA). RIAA recently updated its 47-year old Gold and Platinum program to include master ringtones.

Master ringtones come from the original recording, rather than a synthesized instrumental version, of a song. Just like the existing program, tracks will be certified Gold (500,000 downloads), Platinum (1 million downloads) and Multi-Platinum (starting at 2 million and following in increments of 1 million thereafter). Some 84 ringtones were certified as gold, 40 as platinum, and four as multiplatinum. This initial award certifies at least 90 million downloads. With downloads costing as much as $2.99 each, this represents a huge revenue stream for the vendors, record companies and artists.

In a world filled with cell phones, ringtones that play songs from hiphop to classic or sounds odd serves the practical purpose of differentiating one phone’s ring from another. But, because of that uniqueness, they can also reflect the personality of the user.

"It’s more than a phenomenon," says Karen Brown, Editor of OpenTones, a free ringtone and mobile phone news site. “People see their phone as an extension of their personality. They look for color, for style. They use wallpaper, games, and tones to display their preferences, even their mood. Some people change their ringtone every time they turn the phone on.”

Do free ringtones really exist? Ads offering free downloads abound on the internet and television. Brown makes it clear that the best buy for heavy users could be a ringtone club. They are easy to join. A buyer need only enter their mobile telephone number, then the code that the club sends to the phone. “Some of these clubs are ripoffs. I’ve heard of users being charged as much as $10 a week. Highway robbery. The fine print can hide a real horror story.”

Potential buyers should carefully examine the club’s terms of service before buying. An impulsive ringtone or wallpaper purchase can cost much more than the buyer bargained for, and terminating the contract can be extremely difficult.

###

Share article on social media or email:

View article via:

Pdf Print

Contact Author

Karen Brown

3136719598
Email >
Visit website