New OpEd Released, "George Washington's Constitutional Wish and Today's Congress"

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George Washington is hailed as the first in war and the first in peace. His military battles are well documented, but his peace efforts are less well known. However, on 17 September 1787, the last day of the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, he expressed “his wish” to the gathered delegates. His wish? He wanted to see We the People better represented in the US House of Representatives.

In "George Washington's Constitutional Wish and Today's Congress," an OpEd written by Bryan W. Brickner, George Washington is hailed as the first in war and the first in peace. His military battles are well documented, but his peace efforts are less well known. However, on 17 September 1787, the last day of the Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia, he expressed “his wish” to the gathered delegates. This was the only time he spoke to the convention, and it was a peace effort. His wish? He wanted to see We the People better represented in the US House of Representatives. The founders granted his wish, on paper and in principle, and made a change that preceded the signing of our founding document, the US Constitution. The smudge from the erasure and new writing can still be seen in the original.

The founders agreed to Washington’s wish and changed the representation ratio found in Article 1, Section 2, and Clause 3 to “thirty Thousand” from “forty Thousand.” The constitutional question becomes why is the current Congress, the 109th, not fulfilling Washington’s wish? Why are they not supporting the Constitution?

George Washington wished for the people to be better represented. Today's Congress, with 435 Representatives for 300 million people, is a system of under-representation of We the People. Instead of the constitutional mandate of 30,000 citizens per Representative, each one in the current Congress represents more than 650,000 citizens. That is not what George Washington wanted.

Included in the press package is the op/ed George Washington's Constitutional Wish and Today's Congress and chapter two from the book Article the first of the Bill of Rights.

Link to Publication:     http://www.lulu.com/bryanbrickner
The book is also available at online bookstores such as Amazon.com and others.

About author

Bryan W. Brickner is the author of Article the first of the Bill of Rights (2006) and The Promise Keepers: Politics and Promises (1999). He received his Ph.D. in political science from Purdue University in 1997. He also has published a novel, hereafter (2006). He is currently a writer and activist in Chicago.

About Lulu

Founded in 2002, Lulu is the world’s fastest-growing print-on-demand marketplace for digital do-it-yourselfers. Please see http://www.lulu.com for more information.

Media Contact:    Bryan Brickner, 773-308-3777.

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