The Dreamhelmet -- Would Emily Post Approve?

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Recently, the CBS News Website posed the following hypothetical scenario and question: “Strangers on a Plane: The stranger sitting next to you on a plane leans over to reads your magazine, takes off his shoes and socks, or keeps chatting when all you want to do is nap. The guy in front of you cranks his seat all the way back, while the kid behind you kicks your seat. What’s a polite passenger to do?...”

Recently, the CBS News Website posed the following hypothetical scenario and question: “Strangers on a Plane: The stranger sitting next to you on a plane leans over to reads your magazine, takes off his shoes and socks, or keeps chatting when all you want to do is nap. The guy in front of you cranks his seat all the way back, while the kid behind you kicks your seat. What’s a polite passenger to do?...”

Reporter Tracy Smith, aided by travel journalist Val D’Elia of TravelWithVal.com, offered some solutions on the (June 24, 2006) Saturday Early Show. Val, who has endured her share of annoying strangers on a plane, suggested that one solution to the problem was to make use of the Dreamhelmet.

Although the report suggested no specific reasons, it appears that average air travelers of today are less likely to resemble Beaver Cleaver and family or Mr. Rogers, and more closely fit the profile of soccer hooligans and players, or rapper wannabes and entourage. The upshot is that, chances are, your fellow air passengers will exhibit less manners and grosser social graces than those of an earlier epoch, when people sought the advice of Emily Post.

A changed view of air travel, from being something awesome and novel, like going on a great adventure, to being commonplace, like riding the bus, may be partly to blame for more hang-loose social behavior aboard. It also may be true that the average American really does exhibit less well-mannered behavior, in any situation, than his parents did.

On an airplane, you are a sort of captive participant. Situations can occur at any time from which you might wish to make a graceful exit. So how can a Dreamhelmet save you from this kind of uncomfortable social dilemma?

The Dreamhelmet is a combination sleep-mask pillow that blocks light and muffles sound. It has sound-blocking foam sewed into the pillow portion which covers the ears. The Dreamhelmet allows its user to lean against the plane window or seatback (or traveling companion’s shoulder) and fall asleep. The pillow portion offers some neck support. Secret pockets located near the temple hide money, valuables, foldable reading glasses, soft foam earplugs (provided), or an alarm watch so as not to oversleep.

Putting on your Dreamhelmet is like hanging out a “Do Not Disturb” sign. It is a polite, but effective, way to let others know you have retreated into your own space, no longer want to communicate, and do want peace and quiet. It is not necessary to do or say anything rude to anyone. It not only works for Val, but we think it is also what Emily Post would have done.

Dreamhelmet lets you sleep by blocking light with a generous sleep mask and cradling your head in a soft cotton sound-blocking pillow. Many attractive fabrics please all tastes. Dreamhelmets cost $29.95 plus $4.95 postage The direct 24 hour telephone order number is (888)918-5630.

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