Why Do Americans Fear Death So Much While Other Cultures Embrace It? Author Explains How "Day of the Dead" on November 1 & 2 Will Help Us Live More Fully

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On November 1st and 2nd, Hispanics all over the world will embrace death's reality on Day of the Dead. While death is a topic largely avoided by many Americans, says author Jana Baldridge Vargas of the new book, "The Promise of Death, The Passion of Life," the active remembrance of deceased ancestors and loved ones is traditional among diverse cultures. Day of the Dead gives us an opportunity to examine our own thoughts about death and its reality in our daily lives.

Famous actor and director Woody Allen said it best, “I’m not afraid to die. I just don’t want to be there when it happens.”

Allen exemplifies the typical American’s denial of what is inevitable -- death. Why do Americans fear death so much while other cultures embrace it?

On November 1st and 2nd, Hispanics all over the world, as well as here in the U.S., will embrace death’s reality on All Soul’s Day and All Saint’s Day, more commonly known as Dia de Los Muertos or “Day of the Dead.”

“While death is a topic largely avoided by many Americans,” says author Jana Baldridge Vargas, “the active remembrance of deceased ancestors and loved ones is traditional among diverse cultures.”

In her book, "The Promise of Death, The Passion of Life," Vargas examines our inhibitions with death and explains how we can live more fully with death’s promise. She notes, “Only after a series of personal experiences with loss did I realize that my philosophy of embracing life’s temporary status was key to not only enduring loss, but also living fully.”

Author Jana Baldridge Vargas says the “Day of the Dead” gives us an opportunity to examine our own thoughts about death and its reality in our daily lives. Exploring how other cultures embrace death and loss can bring an expanded perspective into our own lives. Some things we can do on November 1st and 2nd:

·    Visit any of the wonderful “Day of the Dead” exhibits going on in cities throughout the U.S.

·    Read some of the new books on the topics of reflection and loss. “Some of my favorites include Mitch Albom’s (author of Tuesdays with Morrie) latest, For One More Day, Joan Didion’s The Year of Magical Thinking, and Elizabeth Berg’s The Year of Pleasures.”

·    Start some new traditions in your own home to celebrate and acknowledge those who have gone before you. “For example, I have a tradition of creating a memory garden for those I have lost in my life.”

About the Author:

Jana Baldridge Vargas holds a degree in the Social Science of Health and medicine and is completing a master’s in Education. Her articulate grace in discussing such a serious topic as death, but with an embrace of living, has made her a favored speaker and advocate to friends, family and anyone experiencing the loss of a loved one. Jana lives with her husband of 30 years at their homes in California and New Mexico. Visit http://www.thepromiseandthepassion.com for more information about the author, this book or to schedule a speaking engagement.

Contact:     

Jennifer Heinly, J&J Consulting

949-716-9829

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