A Toast to Red Wine and Balsamic Vinegars: Fountain of Youth in a Bottle?

Researchers at Harvard University and the National Institute on Aging discovered that resveratrol, an antioxidant found in red wine, may boost longevity. Cal Orey's "The Healing Powers of Vinegar: A Complete Guide to Nature's Most Remarkable Remedy: Revised and Updated" touts both premium red wine and balsamic vinegars--which researchers said contain disease-fighting polyphenols and perhaps heart-healthy resveratrol-- the liquid to youth.

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The Healing Powers of Vinegar: A Complete Guide to Nature's Most Remarkable Remedy

Lake Tahoe, CA (PRWEB) December 5, 2006

According to a recent article in The New York Times, the antioxidant resveratrol, found in red wine inhibits the "bad effects" of a high calorie diet in mice and adds years to their lifespan. If people add vinegars rich in resveratrol to their diets can it stall Father Time?

Author Cal Orey seems to think so. Resveratol-rich red wine and balsamic vinegars may be the new antiaging key for baby boomer and seniors, Orey said. Her revised and updated book, "The Healing Powers of Vinegar: A Complete Guide to Nature's Most Remarkable Remedy," shows that the while popular apple cider vinegar, high in potassium boosts health (it can help detoxify the body, balance sodium and potassium levels to help make losing those extra pounds easier), it's the Mediterranean-type red wine and balsamic vinegars, that may help fight obesity which is often linked to heart disease.

"They're both derived from grapes," Orey said. "And like red wine, they contain disease-fighting antioxidants such as quercetin and most likely resveratrol. But more research is needed." While studies have shown drinking a glass of red wine daily cut your heart disease risk, "these vinegars can give you all the health benefits of wine, without the alcohol," Orey said. She added, "Teaming these two vinegars with other Mediterranean-type foods high in resveratrol, such as blueberries and peanuts, may help people around the globe to lose body fat, and stall age-related diseases."

According to Orey, a fruit-flavored vinegar craze in Asia is also newsworthy. A new trend in Japan is to consume vinegar drinks, in particular those made from fruit. A Korean delight, persimmon vinegar, an excellent source of youth-boosting vitamins A and C, may also be beneficial to turn back the clock.

"These other vinegars are drawing attention worldwide, especially paired with nutrient-rich antioxidant rich "superfoods" that contain disease-fighting compounds, like resveratrol, so people can stall aging, and live a longer, healthier life," Orey said.

About the Author

Cal Orey is an accomplished author and journalist. Her books include: "The Healing Powers of Vinegar: A Complete Guide to Nature's Most Remarkable Remedy," "Doctors' Orders," "202 Pets' Peeves" and "The Man Who Predicts Earthquakes." For more information or to schedule an interview, contact the author via e-mail or visit http://www.calorey.com.

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