Book Release Announcement: Our Father's World Addresses Issues Related to Evangelicals and the Environmental Crisis

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"Our Father's World: Mobilizing the Church to Care for Creation" is a passionate, biblical and optimistic appeal to church leaders and church members to accept the challenge of secular environmentalists to join them in caring for creation. Rev. Edward Brown, the Director of Care of Creation Inc., an evangelical environmental organization, is well-qualified to address both the environmental and theological aspects of this topic and does so in a measured, thoughtful and engaging manner. This book will be a 'must read' for evangelicals and secular environmentalists alike. Published by Doorlight Publications, South Hadley MA.

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Care of Creation Inc. of Madison, WI and Doorlight Publications are pleased to announce the release of "Our Father's World: Mobilizing the Church to Care for Creation" by Rev. Edward Brown, Director of Care of Creation Inc. (http://careofcreation.org)

Joining an ongoing national debate on the role evangelicals can - or should - play in the environmental movement, this book is a passionate and practical assessment from one of the leaders of the evangelical side of that discussion. Brown writes partly in response to E.O. Wilson of Harvard, who appeals to people of faith in his recent book "The Creation" to join in helping to save Creation.

Demonstrating a thorough knowledge of the writings of mainstream environmentalists like Wilson, Brown addresses evangelicals in language they will understand, and builds a strong biblical case for the involvement of the church in creation care:

"There is an underlying spiritual dissonance in the universe that makes it impossible for us to live within our means and in harmony with the natural systems that support our lives. . .This being the case, the most careful science and the best economic theories and the most profound governmental policies, while necessary, will never be enough. We have a spiritual problem, and we need a spiritual solution." (from the book)

Our Father's World shows the reasons for this "spiritual problem", the solutions offered in the Bible, and practical ways that churches can integrate creation care into their programming. Topics include creation-sensitive worship, educational and youth group activities that will reach the next generation, suggestions for managing buildings and grounds and local and international outreach programs.

Dr. David Howard, former President of Latin America Mission, says of this book:

"This book is a remarkable combination of a broad spectrum of the environmental crisis in the world today coupled with a deep understanding of God's desire for his creation as developed in the scriptures. . . I highly recommend this book as both easily readable yet profound in its challenge to Christians and others today."

Our Father's World (ISBN 097783722X, 168 pages, Paperback) is available on December 15. Advance orders are now being accepted on the Care of Creation website (http://careofcreation.org/ofw.main.cfm). Contact the author through Care of Creation for review copies or additional information.

Additional Information:

Care of Creation, Inc: PO Box 44582, Madison WI 53744, 608-469-7821 http://careofcreation.org

Doorlight Publications: PO Box 718, South Hadley, MA 01075

Additional Excerpts from the book:

On the problem of environmental degradation:

My convictions about the role of the Church in this crisis come from a belief that environmental problems are sin problems. There is an underlying spiritual dissonance in the universe that makes it impossible for us to live within our means and in harmony with the natural systems that support our lives. We are out of touch with the One who runs the place. This being the case, the most careful science and the best economic theories and the most profound governmental policies, while necessary, will never be enough. We have a spiritual problem, and we need a spiritual solution.

Solving spiritual problems is what the church is all about, and that is what we can bring to the table in this crisis. We call it redemption - God's plan and provision to reconcile all things to himself, and it applies as much to our environmental crisis as it does to every other aspect of our lives.

On the effects of sin:

What we are seeing in the world today is ample evidence that rules matter. We cannot disobey with impunity. There are limits to how far we can push our rebellion against God when it comes to his creation. After too much abuse, the land will refuse to produce crops. The ocean will stop yielding fish. Wells will dry up. Rules matter. Sin has consequences. My son wasn't happy when I called him on his three minute infraction. But he never violated a curfew again. He learned that rules do matter, but that within the rules there could be peace and freedom. If he was going to be late, he learned to call. He explained, we negotiated. He learned to live within the rules. But getting back inside God's rules is not so simple. Who do we call to say we're late and we're lost? It is good and necessary to learn what the rules are - that is the role of ecology and biology. And it is fine to say that God's rules for living in his creation are good, and that we need to get back inside that web of relationship. But we can't. The web has been broken.

On the role of the church:

We concluded in chapter four that the environmental crisis is essentially a disease caused by sin and by sinfulness. Essentially, bad behavior (materialism, greed, selfishness) caused and perpetuated by a tendency toward and an inability to break out of bad behavior patterns lies at the root of the whole problem. Any psychologist or psychiatrist could tell us what we need to do: Break the pattern so we can stop the behavior. If this sounds like therapy, you're right. Therapy is what we need. And this is something the church is very, very good at: Helping people to understand their sin and guilt, coming to God for forgiveness and help, and changing how we live. We need to apply our ability to confront and change behavior to creation care. Environmental problems are sin problems - and sin is something the church knows how to handle.

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