Exercise Is A Key Aspect Of Managing Type 2 Diabetes

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With the number of Australians living with diabetes already exceeding 7%, Diabetes is a significant and growing problem in Australia both socially and financially. In 2003, the DiabCo$t Australia Study found that the average annual cost for each person with type 2 diabetes is $5360. However, the real cost to many people with diabetes, when the condition is not managed properly, can be a loss of quality of life. Leading health and well-being expert, Dr Adam Fraser, has identified exercise as an effective, free diabetes management tool.

With the number of Australians living with diabetes already exceeding 7%, Diabetes is a significant and growing problem in Australia both socially and financially. In 2003, the DiabCo$t Australia Study found that the average annual cost for each person with type 2 diabetes is $5360.

However, the real cost to many people with diabetes, when the condition is not managed properly, can be a loss of quality of life. Leading health and well-being expert, Dr Adam Fraser, has identified exercise as an effective, free diabetes management tool.

In a recent interview with The Official Diabetes BlogTM, Dr Adam Fraser said that many people with diabetes are sick of being treated like a disease and are confused about what they need to do in terms of their lifestyle. "There's a lot of misinformation, which is causing confusion," he said.

According to Dr Fraser, many people don't realise how effective exercise can be in increasing insulin sensitivity in people with diabetes. Additionally, exercising has a whole raft of other benefits, including helping to combat diabetes related complications such as heart disease and circulation.

The most recent edition of the Diabetes Atlas from the International Diabetes Federation also identified exercise as an important lifestyle factor. It recommended that people should aim to maintain regular physical activity within a balanced lifestyle.

However, it is also important if you haven't exercised for a while that you seek medical advice before getting started. Then start out at a manageable intensity level and build upon it as your fitness increases.

"It's important to get a routine going and make it practical and fun. Try to involve your family and friends too wherever you can," said Dr Adam.

Dr Fraser also recommends seeing an exercise physiologist who has experience dealing specifically with diabetes sufferers, when planning an exercise routine. "Don't take advice from well-meaning neighbours or friends if they don't have professional expertise. Their advice may do you harm, even though they're trying to help," he said.

The key message is that exercise should be fun and can fit in with your lifestyle. Also, people should be aware that not only does exercise carry health benefits, it also has additional financial and social benefits.

The interview with Dr Adam Fraser is part of an ongoing series of audio interviews being made available to visitors to http://www.OfficialDiabetesBlog.com.

The website is an online meeting place for people with diabetes and is working to raise a greater awareness about the condition, both in Australia and around the world.

To access this and other interviews please visit: http://www.OfficialDiabetesBlog.com/interviews.

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