Human Capital Institute Holds Talent Summit in Johannesburg

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The Human Capital Institute (HCI), a global professional association and educator in talent management strategies announced today that its first talent summit in Johannesburg, South Africa, held November 9-10, had a capacity crowd of about 200 people. The event met with a high level of audience participation and enthusiasm, with 92 percent of attending delegates providing highly positive post-event feedback.

The feedback from the first Gauteng Talent Summit has been incredibly positive

The Human Capital Institute (HCI), a global professional association and educator in talent management strategies announced today that its first talent summit in Johannesburg, South Africa, held November 9-10, had a capacity crowd of about 200 people. The event met with a high level of audience participation and enthusiasm, with 92 percent of attending delegates providing highly positive post-event feedback.

Gauteng Talent Summit 2006 was co-sponsored by Deloitte, Wits Business School, the University of Johannesburg, and the Human Capital Institute Africa (HCI Africa) in order to address a less than healthy talent situation in the region.

Several issues confront Gauteng, a province with 9.5 million people considered to be the economic hub of South Africa. Although talent is recognized as the most important source of competitive advantage, market leaders are struggling to realize its potential. Top executives understand well the relationship between talent and business success and reflect it in their mission statements, goals, values, and standards, but not in their business strategies.

The situation is further exacerbated by the fact that executive commitment is still very much focused on budgets and operational issues rather than on talent acquisition, development, deployment, and retention. Executives do not get directly involved in reviewing top talent or strengthening talent pools. Moreover, talent acquisition is not based on long-term planning; instead, it is in response to addressing immediate needs. Talent review processes are in place, but they lack the support of top management.

If these issues weren't challenging enough, there is also an exit of talent from the country, which is the result of the high level of crime, as well as better career and economic opportunities elsewhere.

Gauteng Talent Summit 2006 addressed these critical topics with a series of presentations, panel discussions, and a workshop. Professor Patrick FitzGerald, Dean of the Faculty of Commerce, Law & Management at the University of the Witwatersrand and author of five books, including "Managing Sustainable Development in South Africa," delivered the opening address. FitzGerald believes South African organizations need to master the art of integrating strategy, change management, and project management to achieve heightened levels of performance. HCI President & Executive Director Allan Schweyer, the international guest speaker, spoke on "The Age of Talent."

"The feedback from the first Gauteng Talent Summit has been incredibly positive," said Jeff Sacht, Founder and Executive Director of the Human Capital Institute Africa. "One delegate's comment says it best: "The event certainly raised the level of consciousness. Gauteng Talent Summit affirmed the HR agenda and profession as the cornerstone and catalyst for change in the country."

Sacht, along with Summit Chairman Goodnews Cadogan and Vice-Chairman Henry Grimbeek, have drafted Gauteng Summit Talent Resolutions that will serve as programs of action for addressing the talent issues confronting Gauteng, with the intent of repositioning and transforming the region to better compete in a world where knowledge workers drive wealth creation.

ABOUT THE HUMAN CAPITAL INSTITUTE

The Human Capital Institute is a think tank, educator, and global professional association dedicated to the advancement of talent management practices with individuals and organizations. HCI serves as a catalyst for innovative thinking in integrated talent strategy, acquisition, development, engagement, management, and measurement. Through research and collaboration, HCI programs collect original, creative ideas from a field of the brightest thought leaders in talent management. Those ideas are then transformed into measurable, real-world strategies that help its members attract and retain high-performing people, build a diverse, inclusive workplace, and leverage individual and team performance throughout the enterprise. HCI members represent a broad coalition of educators, talent managers and executives. For more information, please visit: http://www.humancapitalinstitute.org

PRESS CONTACTS

Human Capital Institute

Andrea Miller

866-538-1909

This press release was distributed through eMediawire by Human Resources Marketer (HR Marketer: http://www.HRmarketer.com) on behalf of the company listed above.

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