New Protocol Established by University of Utah for Determining Adherence to NIOSH Definition of a Closed-system

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New evidence-based research for determining adherence to the NIOSH definition of a closed-system was unveiled at the ASHP Mid-year meeting by the University of Utah.

We've used the PhaSeal System for five years at the University of Utah

New evidence-based research for determining adherence to the NIOSH definition of a closed-system was unveiled at the ASHP Mid-year meeting by the University of Utah.

Project advisor Jim Jorgenson, Administrative Director of Pharmacy Services at University of Utah Health Care, and project lead Cam Au, Pharm. D., tested 5 transfer devices by using titanium tetrachloride to determine which device prevents the escape of vapor, hence meeting the NIOSH definition of closed. Closed-system drug transfer devices are recommended by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) for the containment of hazardous drugs.

The five devices tested were the Alaris Smart Site by Cardinal Health, Tevadaptor Vial Adaptor System by Teva Medical, Ltd., Chemo Mini-Spike Plus Dispensing Pin by B.Braun, the Chemoprotect Spike by Codan US Corporation and PhaSeal Protector 50 & Injector Leur Lock by Carmel Pharma.

Only the PhaSeal System by Carmel Pharma, prevented the release of the titanium smoke out of the closed-system drug transfer device.

Only the PhaSeal System met the definition of a closed-system drug transfer device.

“We’ve used the PhaSeal System for five years at the University of Utah,” Jorgenson said, “and the study confirms selecting it was the right choice.”

University Health Care is the only academic health care system in the Intermountain West. As part of that system, University Hospitals & Clinics offer services in more than 120 specialties and is consistently ranked as one of the country’s best hospitals by U.S. News & World Report. The system provides care for Utahns and residents of five surrounding states in a referral area encompassing more than 10 percent of the continental United States. The hospitals and clinics log more than 900,000 outpatient visits and more than 23,000 inpatient admissions each year. Its academic partners at the University of Utah School of Medicine and Colleges of Nursing, Pharmacy, and Health are internationally regarded research and teaching institutions.

With over 10 peer-reviewed, independent studies currently available, the PhaSeal System is the only clinically proven closed-system drug transfer device available today. The System consists of an Expansion Chamber that captures aerosols and vapors while equalizing the pressure in the vial, a Double membrane that ensures dry connections, and a Needle-Safe Design that enables the retrieval of all the drug from the vial.

The PhaSeal System is manufactured by Carmel Pharma ab in Gothenburg, Sweden and is distributed from its U.S. affiliate office, Carmel Pharma, Inc., in Columbus, OH. PhaSeal has been in use in the U.S. since 2000 and has been implemented in over 400 cancer centers, oncology practices, specialty pharmacies in the United States, including M.D. Anderson in Houston, TX, Texas Children’s and UCSF. If you have questions regarding the PhaSeal System or Carmel Pharma, Inc., please contact Christine Crooks, Director of Marketing at 1-866-487-9250 ext.202, or email us.

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Christine Crooks
Carmel Pharma
1-866-487-9250 +202
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