Healthy Portions Key to Keeping Off the Holiday Pounds

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Portion control is something many Americans battle with daily. Restaurant portions are often twice the recommended serving size, and we rarely measure out suggested servings at home. It's no wonder that many people think they are eating healthy without realizing that the amount of food they consume may be more to blame for increased weight than what they're eating.

Portion control is something many Americans battle with daily. Restaurant portions are often twice the recommended serving size, and we rarely measure out suggested servings at home. It's no wonder that many people think they are eating healthy without realizing that the amount of food they consume may be more to blame for increased weight than what they're eating.

Patients are often asked to lose weight before gastric bypass surgery, and people who have had the procedure also are limited as to how much they eat. Around the holidays, portion control is important because celebrations with all of our friends, family and favorite foods can increase temptation.

Recent reports reveal that Americans are eating much larger portions than they were 40 years ago. This means that no matter how healthy the food, if you eat too much, you will gain weight. People who have chosen to adopt a healthier lifestyle through gastric bypass surgery are counseled extensively before their surgery regarding the lifestyle changes they will have to adopt to be successful.

Gastric bypass surgery is not a quick fix; rather, it is a single tool in the quest to improve a person's health and quality of life. In addition to drastically reducing the size of an individual's stomach, gastric bypass surgery is also the first step in a series of lifestyle changes. Simply reducing stomach size is not enough; patients must adopt a new diet, eating lower-fat and high-protein foods to ensure proper nutrition since the amount of food they consume will be reduced.

"There is real truth to the old saying 'everything in moderation,'" said Eugene Rumsey, M.D., F.A.C.S., surgeon at Scripps Mercy Hospital and Pacific Bariatric Surgical Medical Group (http://www.pbsmg.com). "Even patients who have achieved their weight loss goals should be mindful of the amount of food they are eating."

Surgeons at Pacific Bariatric (http://www.pbsmg.com) have performed over 9,500 procedures on adult and adolescent patients at Scripps Mercy Hospital. As a result of outstanding aftercare programs and support groups, patients at Pacific Bariatric see a success rate of slightly higher than the national average.

Pacific Bariatric Surgical Medical Group, Inc. and Scripps Mercy Hospital are nationally designated by the American Society for Bariatric Surgery as a Center of Excellence for Bariatric Surgery. Pacific Bariatric Surgical Medical Group, also known as Hillcrest Surgical Medical Group, Inc., has an 80-year tradition of surgical excellence and leadership in San Diego County. For more information, visit http://www.pbsmg.com.

Established in 1890 by the Sisters of Mercy, Scripps Mercy Hospital serves the San Diego and Chula Vista communities. With 700 licensed beds, more than 3,000 employees and 1,300 physicians, Scripps Mercy Hospital is San Diego's longest established and only Catholic hospital. With two campuses, Scripps Mercy Hospital is the largest hospital in San Diego County and one of the 10 largest in California.

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