Did NASA's Viking Experiments Really Kill "Alien" Life -- Scientists Available for Comment

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Renowned astronomer and physicist, Dr. Hugh Ross and internationally respected biochemist, Dr. Fazale "Fuz" Rana are available for comment on the scientific probability that NASA's Viking experiments of the '70's killed alien life.

If the internal fluid of life on Mars were a mixture of water and hydrogen peroxide instead of water and salt, then indeed the experimental techniques employed by the Viking craft would have destroyed any such life that might have been present

Once again astrobiologists are speculating that extreme forms of life may exist on Mars. This time they are claiming that the Viking probes of 1976-77 inadvertently killed the very life for which they were searching.

Nearly two decades ago, in 1988, astronomer Dr. Hugh Ross wrote that NASA scientists would inevitably find not only traces of liquid water on Mars but also life remains. He predicted that these discoveries would be interpreted as support for a spontaneous natural origin of life on Mars.

"If the internal fluid of life on Mars were a mixture of water and hydrogen peroxide instead of water and salt, then indeed the experimental techniques employed by the Viking craft would have destroyed any such life that might have been present," states Ross.

"However, the recent Schulze-Makuch report is based on enormous assumptions that may or may not be accurate. The discovery of life remains on Mars does not prove that life spontaneously erupts wherever a tiny amount of water might exist."

The team of scientists at the premier science-faith think tank Reasons To Believe urges caution in taking the Schulze-Makuch theory too seriously. The RTB scientists point out a very basic scientific fact. Hydrogen peroxide-based life could never have originated on Mars.

"Extremophiles are irrelevant to origin-of-life," says RTB biochemist Fuz Rana. "While life does exist under extreme conditions and in extreme forms throughout the Earth's environments, it cannot originate under those conditions. Hydrogen peroxide is especially lethal to origin-of-life chemistry."

Since the most up-to-date findings of origin-of-life research supports the RTB claim that life could never have originated on Mars, how, then, could possible evidences of life remains get there?

"Large meteor impacts on Earth will eject Earth material into interplanetary space," explains Ross. "Since every ton of Earth soil contains over a hundred quadrillion microbes, and since astronomers know that approximately 2 percent of all Earth-ejected material eventually lands on Mars, the Martian surface should, indeed, be littered with the remains of life--Earth life, not Martian life."

Contact: Kathleen Campbell

Campbell Public Relations, LLC

719-540-6022

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KATHLEEN CAMPBELL
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