Sales Professionals Need Fuel-Efficient, Not Electric, Says LearningAndLife.com

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With last week's buzz from the 2007 North American International Auto Show press preview, LearningAndLife.com advises sales professionals to go fuel-efficient instead of setting their hopes on electric. The electric concept Chevrolet Volt is three to five years away from production, and as currently designed it isn't practical for most sales professionals. However, tried-and-true fuel-efficient models could save sales professionals a lot of money compared to other vehicles. LearningAndLife.com reviews some of several fuel-efficient models that can now be grabbed for last year's prices.

Although the Chevrolet Volt caused a stir this week at the 2007 North American International Auto Show (NAIAS) press preview, LearningAndLife.com advises sales professionals to consider fuel-efficient vehicles instead. In addition to not being currently available, the electric concept Chevrolet Volt isn't practical for most sales professionals. LearningAndLife.com--an online resource featuring career tips, educational advice, and school listings-- reviews currently available fuel-efficient cars and weighs their benefits in "Fuel Efficient Cars Can Save Your Sales Business Money" (http://www.learningandlife.com/business-careers/fuel-efficient-cars-can-save-your-sales-business-money.php).

The big news at the 2007 North American International Auto Show press preview centered on a new concept car produced by General Motors. The Chevrolet Volt is powered by a lithium ion battery that has a range of 40 city miles after a six-hour charge from a regular household electrical outlet.

However, most salespeople drive almost twice that distance, making a hybrid or other fuel-efficient vehicle more practical in concept. LearningAndLife.com's article, "Fuel Efficient Cars Can Save Your Sales Business Money" offers an overview of four different fuel-efficient cars that are currently on the market and are affordable: the Honda Insight, the Toyota Prius, the Volkswagen Golf TDI, and the Honda Civic HX. The article then reviews the cars in terms of:

  •     Gas mileage
  •     Number of seats
  •     Reliability
  •     Handling power

According to the Environmental Protection Agency's 2007 report on fuel-efficient cars, the top four cars can get between 36 and 60 miles per gallon. Consider the difference: A busy sales rep that drives 100 miles a day and buys fuel at $2.80 per gallon would pay $14.00 to drive a car that gets 20 miles per gallon. That same rep would pay only $4.67 in a fuel efficient vehicle that gets 60 miles per gallon.

Fuel-efficient vehicles can also save people money during tax time. According to the U.S. government's website FuelEconomy.com, "Hybrids purchased or placed into service after December 31, 2005 may be eligible for a federal income tax credit of up to $3,400."

LearningAndLife.com (http://www.LearningAndLife.com) features helpful information and tips on education, career options, and job training. The site offers the advice and tools you need to enrich your life and advance your career.

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