Department of Defense Grants Inologic $1.1M to Develop Radioprotective "Morning After" Pill

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Inologic, a Seattle biopharmaceutical company, has received a Department of Defense grant for nearly $1.1 million to develop a radioprotective drug that could either act before radiation exposure to protect the body from radiation damage or act as a type of "morning after" drug and help repair damage once it has occurred. The drug could potentially protect U.S. troops and protect or treat the public if exposed to radioactive material. In light of recent events such as the public health scare associated with the radiation contamination of ex-Russian spy Alexander Litvinenko, who died of exposure to the radioactive material polonium-210, the availability of such a radioprotective drug could have significant health benefits.

Inologic, an innovative biopharmaceutical company based in Seattle, announced that it has been awarded a $1.07 million government contract from the Uniformed Services University in conjunction with the Armed Forces Radiobiology Research Institute and the Department of Defense. The contract will fund Inologic's efforts to develop radioprotective agents as radiation countermeasures against nuclear attack or accident. Inologic credits Senator Patty Murray (D-WA) with helping to secure these important research funds from the Department of Defense.

Inologic received the contract to develop a radioprotective drug that could either act before radiation exposure to protect the body from radiation damage or act as a type of "morning after" drug and help repair damage once it has occurred. Of particular interest to the Department of Defense is the potential ability of the drug to protect U.S. troops from the ever-changing hazards they face. The drug could also be used to protect or treat the public if exposed to radioactive material. In light of recent events such as the public health scare associated with the radiation contamination of several British Airways planes, affecting as many as 30,000 travelers, and the death of ex-Russian spy Alexander Litvinenko, who died of exposure to the radioactive material polonium-210, the availability of such a radioprotective drug could have significant health benefits.

"Our technology is unique and offers considerable advantages for developing this kind of drug," said Dr. Beatrice Langton-Webster, chief executive officer of Inologic. "This contract will enable us to work on discovering a drug that is safe and cost-effective and, most importantly, can be used prior to or after exposure to radiation. We believe this drug could have significant impact in providing first responders, the public and the military with a needed measure of safety and security."

Inologic's radioprotective drugs are based on the company's proprietary inositol signaling molecules (ISMs) and could protect or reverse the harmful effects of exposure to ionizing radiation. "We are very grateful to senator Murray for the opportunity to bring this promising radioprotective research into the Washington state biodefense initiative," said Michael Buhrmann, chairman of Inologic's board.

For more information, please visit http://www.inologic.com or contact Dr. Beatrice Langton-Webster at (206) 812-1510 or by e-mail.

About Inologic

Inologic, Inc., is a biopharmaceutical company with a leadership position in the discovery and development of a new class of therapeutic drugs based on inositol signaling molecules (ISMs) and their role in regulating cell functions. Inologic believes its proprietary compounds can affect the key signaling pathways linked to many serious diseases, including cancer treatment and radioprotection, inflammation inflammatory and pulmonary disorders such as cystic fibrosis and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Inologic has a unique and practical approach to discovering new drug leads, and the approach has rapidly yielded a number of drug candidates ranging from discovery research to viable clinical leads. Inologic is focusing its discovery and development efforts on the advancement of compounds for cancer treatment and drugs that will be used as radioprotective agents.

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Michelle Laird
Inologic
503-705-4577
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