Housing, Energy Efficiency, Environmental Benefits Forecast Positive Year for Vinyl

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The year 2007 is looking to be a very positive year for the vinyl industry, according to Vinyl Institute President Tim Burns.

Vinyl is making an increasingly important contribution to water conservation.

The year 2007 is looking to be a very positive year for the vinyl industry, according to Vinyl Institute President Tim Burns. Forecasts of continued strong economic growth, an expected rebound in the housing sector, and growing recognition of vinyl as one of the most resource- and energy-efficient materials for both residential and commercial building are all positive indicators, he said.

Burns pointed out that vinyl (PVC) in now the leading pipe material in the United States on a lineal basis, accounting for some 70 percent of all water and sewer pipe now being installed. “More and more municipalities are discovering that PVC pipe saves money, saves water, saves energy, and is more durable than alternatives,” Burns said. “Vinyl is making an increasingly important contribution to water conservation.”

By contrast, more than 2 trillion gallons of treated water are lost every year from aging, corroded and leaking pipes made of other materials, he noted.

The growing demand for vinyl windows, doors, siding and roofing represent increasing recognition of vinyl’s energy-saving qualities, Burns said, noting that vinyl products have been incorporated into buildings certified to meet the LEED green-building rating system of the US Green Building Council. One of the first notable examples was the highly energy-efficient flexible vinyl roof over the LEED-rated Olympic Oval in Salt Lake City.

Spurred by this recognition, a new generation of creative young designers is coming up with exciting new uses for vinyl, from imaginative award-winning interiors that capture today's lifestyles to complete energy-saving vacation and retirement homes, he said.

More than two dozen life-cycle evaluations of vinyl building products have found that they perform as well as or better than most competing products in energy-efficiency, insulation and durability, resulting in significant resource conservation, Burns noted. “In other words, vinyl is being increasingly and accurately recognized as an important ‘green’ building material. When combined with vinyl’s distinct advantages in affordability, 2007 could prove to be an excellent year for our industry.”

Burns also noted that 2007 marks the 25th anniversary of the Vinyl Institute.

For more information, go to http://www.vinylindesign.com or http://www.vinylnewsservice.net.

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John Brown

877-234-9749

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