Skin Health Expert Suggests Alternative Skin Whitening Treatments In Face of Possible Hydroquinone Ban

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The anticipation of the FDA's ruling on the safety of this skin lightening agent provides skin health expert Naweko Nicole Dial an opportunity to alternative skin brightening ingredients to hydroquinone.

The anticipation of the FDA's ruling on the safety of this skin lightening agent provides skin health expert Naweko Nicole Dial an opportunity to alternative skin brightening ingredients to hydroquinone.

In 2007, the Food and Drug Administration could decide to ban products containing the popular skin lightening agent hydroquinone because of its potential carcinogenic and skin damaging effects. According to Naweko Nicole Dial, to president of the San Diego based skin research firm Noixia, "This possible loss of easy access to hydroquinone increases the need for alternative skin lightening methods."

As a skin whitening product, hydroquinone has been used to treat conditions like age spots, melasma and acne scars. Skin bleachers interfere with at least one of the numerous steps involved in creating the pigment melanin, and bringing this color to the surface of the skin. Dial predicts, "In the future, if skin whitening creams containing hydroquinone require a prescription, more consumers may turn to unconventional skin lightening agents like vitamins, fruit acids, botanical extracts and novel chemicals to correct cosmetic blemishes."

Dial explains that skin care products that contain adequate amounts of niacinamide, a derivative of vitamin B3, and vitamin C have demonstrated an ability to lighten the skin. But, adds Dial, "An effective skin lightener will need to contain between 3-5% of the skin brightening vitamin to be effective."

Another antioxidant, glutathione, has surfaced as skin brightener. Glutathione is made in the body with the help of a selenium and protein balanced diet. However, points out Dial, "The amount of glutathione needed in topical products to induce skin lightening is not yet standardized."

Another ingredient that consumer may look for in skin lightener's is arbutin. Arbutin is a naturally occurring hydroquinone found in plants. While not a vitamin, food analysis published in the Journal of Toxicology and Environmental Health Analysis observed significant amounts of arbutin in wheat products, pears, and coffee and tea.

Arbutin works like hydroquinone, to disrupt the reactions that lead to the formation of the skin pigment melanin. But, Dial explains, "Studies have shown arbutin to be less effective than hydroquinone and niacinamide at lightening the skin."

Besides vitamins, Dial explains that consumers can also use facial peels to brighten the skin. Peels that contain lactic acid and azelaic acid have demonstrated the ability to lighten the skin.

While consumers scour stores for skin lightening options, Dial recommends, "Carefully read the instructions for the creams because a key part of successful skin lightening is making certain that the product can optimally penetrate the skin, and so some products have specific instructions on cleaning the face."

Moreover for the best results from any skin lightening product, Dial advises, to "Stay patient with your skin brightening program." Because most satisfactory results achieved from skin lightening come after four to six weeks. More severe cases required more time.

About:

Noixia is an image makeover research firm dedicated to helping people intelligently, affordably and safely enhance their image. Noixia's core focus is offering customized skin solutions for individuals with acne scars on the face and body. Noixia's product development edge is based on proprietary skin absorption techniques, key ingredient release mechanisms and innovative wound healing technologies.

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Nicole Dial
Noixia
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