Getting Organized is Difficult for DayTimer Survey Respondents

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Nearly half of the respondents in a recent DayTimers telephone survey conducted by Opinion Research Corporation noted that they had not been able to get organized in the past five years. And 79% were not able to succeed at putting in fewer hours at work each week.

We often feel the need to keep every magazine, newsletter and newspaper we receive.

Nearly half of the respondents in a recent DayTimers telephone survey conducted by Opinion Research Corporation noted that they had not been able to get organized in the past five years. And 79% were not able to succeed at putting in fewer hours at work each week.

"Managing excessive amounts of information - from traditional sources and the must-have technology products - coupled with the impossible demand to do it all has left many of us feeling overwhelmed," stated Maria Woytek, DayTimers life management expert.

For the past 60 years, DayTimers, the original American time management company, has offered organization tools and time management solutions. "Our mission is to help people gain back control of their lives," Woytek explained. "We've developed a number of ideas that have worked for thousands of people."

Quick Tip #1: Keep It Simple: For each new thing you bring into your life, throw two old things out.

"It's difficult (and time-consuming) to read everything, yet it's easy to get caught up in information overload," said Lisa Kanarek, one of the nation's leading organization experts. "We often feel the need to keep every magazine, newsletter and newspaper we receive."

The reality is that people hold on to information with the belief that they will one day read it all.

Quick Tip #2: If you think you'll most likely not read something -- get rid of it. Put it in the recycling bin, delete the email or through the shredder.

For some people, it becomes difficult to know what to keep and what to toss. Kanarek has developed the following 'toss test' that helps people decide whether or not to keep something.

Quick Tip #3: Answer these questions: Have you used it in the past year? Does it have a specific purpose or does it have important sentimental value?

If you're going to keep the item, store it in a specific place where it can be used easily. If it has sentimental value, then treasure it and give it a place of honor. If not, march to the trash and let it go.

Are you thinking about whether you can get to the team baseball game while at a business meeting? Are you regretting a missed workout while making dinner? Are you figuring out how to get the kids to soccer practice while you're at a business luncheon?

"Worry has a way of eating up time and creating clutter in your mind, all while you're missing the activity you're presently involved in," Ms. Woytek cautioned.

Quick Tip #4: Create a Master Life Plan. Put it all down in one planning system - a monthly calendar, a two-page-per-day planner, or a PDA. Put all the demands on your time into your organization system - work, family, social obligations. Be sure to build in time for yourself - like time to exercise or to meditate - along with all your essential must-do's for everyday life. By blocking out time for your activities, you can be present (both physically and mentally) for each one, knowing that your other activities have their regular time slot, as well.

"The hardest part of maintaining one's schedule is the unscheduled demands on our time," commented Woytek. In a DayTimer survey of individuals from the general population, more than half felt that competition from other tasks and procrastination were the top reasons for not accomplishing the things they needed to do.

Quick Tip #5: Smile and say, "No thank you." You must be your own best friend and guardian of your time. In other words, don't allow other people to coerce you into spending time in ways that pleases them, but creates stress and overload in your life. Practice saying, "Sorry, I can't…but if things change, I'll let you know." You'll find this activity brings a secret joy to your life. You now feel in control of your time.

The 2006 DayTimers New Year's Resolution Survey was conducted via telephone by Opinion Research Corporation on December 15 - 18, 2006 as part of an omnibus study. A total of 1,031 adults in the continental U.S. , including 516 men and 515 women 18 years and older, participated in the survey. The interviews were weighted by four variables: age, sex, geographic region, and race to ensure reliable and accurate representation of the total population. The data was also cross-tabulated by sex, age, region, race, household income, household size, children in household, and education. The survey has a 95% confidence level.

DayTimers, Inc, a subsidiary of ACCO Brands (NYSE: ABD), is the leading company providing time management solutions and organization tools. Established in 1947, DayTimers is the original American company offering hundreds of organization and time-management tools that help simplify life's demands. The DayTimer line of luxury leather planner covers, portfolios, handbags and totes can be found at http://www.daytimer.com or by calling 1-800-225-5005. The DayTimer line of planners and calendars can be found at http://www.daytimer.com, as well as at Staples, Office Depot, and other major office supply retailers.

Subsidiary of ACCO Brands Corporation

Contact: Leesa Raab, LaMotta Strategic Communications, Inc. 845-358-6306(o).

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