Short Vacation Not Good For Long Haul Reports Visitors of TravelAndTourReview.com

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Most visitors to TravelAndTourReview.com prefer the longer vacation of 9 days to 16 days. With work-related illness, stress and burnout on the rise, experts continue to emphasize the need for more vacation time. Across the country, would-be travelers have turned to TravelAndTourReview.com to help them with their extended travel plans.

Of those TravelAndTourReview.com visitors who requested travel brochures, 90 percent indicated a desire to travel for 9 days to 16 days. The growing demand at top online travel resource TravelAndTourReview.com for longer vacations reflects a workforce awakening to the need for more time off.

With many experts emphasizing the need for long breaks, travelers have turned to online travel resource TravelAndTourReview.com to connect them with travel and tour providers (http://www.travelandtourreview.com). Most TravelAndTourReview.com visitors have elected to travel for the recommended two weeks. European vacations are especially popular. Italy is the top travel destination, followed by the United Kingdom and France.

According to "Psychology Today," Americans work, on average, 100 more hours a year than the Japanese, and up to three months more than Europeans. Despite all that hard work, Americans take pitifully short vacations--a mere three to four days on average (much of which goes unused). The result to the physical and mental health of employees is devastating.

A nine-year study by Brooks Gump, associate professor of psychology at State University of New York, revealed that men who failed to use their vacation time for five consecutive years were 30 percent more likely to have a heart attack than their counterparts who used at least one week of their annual vacation time. The same study found an association between skipping even a single year's allotted vacation time and an elevated risk of heart disease.

Nor are the benefits of even a short vacation limited to physical health. In an experiment conducted at Tel Aviv University, psychologists found that both stress and burnout decreased among workers who were given vacation time. As might be expected, more vacation equals less burnout. According to Joe Robinson, lobbyist and author of "Work To Live: The Guide to Getting a Life," "You need more time to fix burnout."

Online travel resource TravelAndTourReview.com has identified and teamed up with some of the most respected and exciting European travel-tour agencies. The brochure request site provides users with the resources they need to plan the perfect vacation.

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JO VIOLET
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