Lawn Disease Attacks Lawn Under Snow, Lawn Care Company Warns Homeowners

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Natural Way Lawn Care and Tree Service of Lake Orion, Michigan warns of a lawn disease that attacks your lawn while it is still under the snow. Without proper care, it can cause major damage to your lawn.

Natural Way Lawn Care and Tree Service of Lake Orion, Michigan warns of a lawn disease that attacks your lawn while it is still under the snow. Without proper care, it can cause major damage to your lawn.

According to Keith Fetzner, owner of Natural Way Lawn Care, it is called Pink Snow Mold, or Fusarium Patch. A professional lawn care company will be able to identify this disease for you, but here is how you can identify the disease for yourself:

This lawn disease attacks your lawn when it is subjected to long stretches of cool, wet weather, and often develops underneath the snow.

Pink Snow Mold can be spread on lawn equipment, on shoes, animals, water, and even floating in the wind.

You may be shocked the next time the snow melts to see your lawn infected with this disease. It looks like rough circular patches of dead and matted grass blades, between 3 and 12 inches in diameter. When this disease attacks, you may see tiny white or pink masses on dead blades of grass. Sometimes blades of grass become light tan and stick together. It can invade the crowns and roots of the grass, causing serious, permanent damage to the lawn.

Fetzner and the lawn care technicians at Natural Way Lawn Care and Tree Service recommends that all homeowners take the following step to protect your lawn from developing this disease under the snow. Or, if your lawn has already been attacked by Pink Snow Mold, these tips will help you to eradicate it:

1. Avoid applying fertilizer in the late fall. Such applications of fertilizer cause the lawn to grow thick and long. Such growth creates a prime environment for Pink Snow Mold.

2. Don't stop mowing the grass in the fall, even if it is growing slowly. If the grass gets too long and then becomes covered with snow, the grass becomes matted, tangled, and damp, inviting the pink snow mold to grow.

3. If you are reseeding in the spring, use resistant turfgrass varieties such as 'Medallion' and 'Scaldis' fine fescues, 'Eclipse' and 'America' Kentucky
bluegrasses, 'Manhattan II' and 'Pennant' perennial ryegrasses.

4. If your lawn has already been attacked by pink snow mold, have your lawn care company apply fungicide in the late autumn just before the snow begins. Heritage, or some fungicides containing the active ingredients thiophanate-methyl, triadimefon, or quintozene can be used. Always read the warning labels before applying any type of fungicide. Your lawn care provider should be able to inform you of any dangers of the fungicide they're using.

5. Ask your lawn care company to use soil bacteria to improve soil. Often it is good to try and reduce thatch, improve drainage, and frequently mow and raking infected patches to dry them.

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