Nanotechnology: A Small World with a Big Future

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US Leads Nanotechnology Investing

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For a market expected to reach $1 trillion by 2015, the small science of nanotechnology has a big future--especially in the United States, where investors have the largest share of global investment (28%) in this science, holding a slight lead over the Japanese market (24% share). In addition, in 2005, venture capitalists showed their confidence in this small science with $500 million in nanotechnology investing. So why is it that this "science of the small" with the potential to revolutionize manufacturing in almost every sector of the economy, including medicine, communication, agriculture, and transportation, is so misunderstood by the public?

What better person to ask than nanotechnology expert Dr. Martin Moskovits, former Dean of Science at UC Santa Barbara and a member of the U.S. Department of Energy's Committee that oversees 5 national centers for nanotechnology. Recently appointed Chief Technology Officer of NY-based API Nanotronics (OTCBB: APIO, Dr. Moskovits, who will lead API's research and development efforts in nanotechnology, stated, "Nanotechnology is a suite of powerful materials synthesis and fabrication technologies that can control structure in the nanometer to 100 nanometer range - precisely the size range where size controls properties. As a technology strategy, nanotechnology will result both in new devices and products based on designer materials and engineered structure, as well as a large number of improvements to existing products and products resulting from the marriage of nanotechnology with currently-used fabrication technologies."

For an idea of the "size range" being referred to, consider the following: a sheet of paper is about 100,000 nanometers thick and a human hair is about 50,000 nanometers wide. Nanotechnology involves the development and use of devices that use the nanoscopic properties of materials, where dimensions are less than 100 nanometers!

The overall concept in nanotechnology is to structure and control matter at close to the atomic level, which will provide opportunities for radical new engineering designs and scientific breakthroughs far into our future.

By utilizing research and advances in these tiny particles, nanotechnology companies already provide systems and electronics for advanced military, industrial, commercial, automotive, and medical applications.

Because nanotechnology is the engineering of machines on a molecular scale--the projected ability to manufacture components, devices and complete products "from the bottom up" using techniques and tools that place every atom and molecule in a desired place, the future of this small science has big potential benefits.

And, what are the benefits of manufacturing with nanotechnology? They include significant increases in material strength, durability and flexibility; better built, longer lasting, cleaner, safer and smarter products; and increasing the efficiency of technology while lowering production costs and shrinking size.

So, the next time the subject of nanotechnology comes up in conversation, "think small"--"think very, very small."

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