The 2007 Summer Job Outlook for Teens: Teens Want to Work but Employers are Reluctant to Hire Them, Says Expert

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A majority of teens want to work this summer because they need the money and to get work experience but businesses are reluctant to hire teens especially those under 18 years old, according to Renée Ward, founder of Teens4Hire.org.

A majority of teens want to work this summer because they need the money and to get work experience but businesses are reluctant to hire teens especially those under 18 years old, according to Renée Ward, founder of http://www.Teens4Hire.org.

She sites a Teens4Hire.org survey of 1,000 teens 14-19 in which they say they want a meaningful paying job this summer. However, when the organization began polling businesses that have traditionally hired teens in the past, most were reluctant to say they'll have summer openings teens could fill.

"Work experience at this stage in life is critical, and people who spend a large share of their young adult years unemployed have a hard time finding and keeping a job later in life," Ward says.

"The human resource people were quick to say, we don't hire teens," says David Craig, a staff member of Teens4Hire.org. "And after I pointed out that 18 and 19 year olds were teenagers they'd say, well, we don't hire minors."

True, child labor laws restrict some of the jobs younger teens can fill (and no one wants them to get injured on the job) but Ward says employers might give younger teens more consideration for non-hazardous positions if they show up at their door. For employers concerned about running afoul of labor laws with regards to the employment of teens, Teens4Hire.org can conduct on-site training for supervisors and/or managers.

Teen summer employment tumbled in 2002 and has been hovering at some of the lowest levels in decades. Older teens 18-19, have more opportunities available to them. For those 14-17, it's a hidden job market. Ward says, look for NOW HIRING signs wherever you go and ask if they would consider hiring you. "Employers want to hire people with a positive attitude and attitude is something a teen can control," she says.

There are some bright spots according to Teens4Hire.org. Best bets are city-run youth programs; amusement, theme and recreation parks; ice cream/juice shops and grocery stores.

Regardless of your age, if you want a paying job you must demonstrate that you have the basic education required to do the job, are willing to work and learn, have a positive attitude, are reliable, and understand the needs of the business.

We provide a great deal of helpful information in the RESOURCES area of Teens4Hire.org to help teens land a job, get work experience and/or explore other ways to earn money.

Teens4Hire.org, reaches about 2 million self-motivated teens across the U.S. looking for work. If you have an opening a teen could fill and/or know of opportunities for teens in your area--contact Teens4Hire.org

The Forward Group, a privately held company publishes Teens4Hire.org and Seniors4Hire.org for those 50 and older.

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