"Hillary 1984" Video Marks the Beginning of a New Kind of Presidential Campaign, According to Research by Marketing Expert

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As Gen X voters come to outnumber baby boomers, the Internet replaces TV as the most critical communications medium. Markering expert Ann Fishman believes the "X Factor" will be decisive in the 2008 shift in American political power.

Gen Xers are practical realists, who realize the power of the Internet, and know that is where the 'action is' in American politics today. The Hillary 1984 video managed to shift the attention of media, and voters, online, within hours of its release.

Howard Dean's presidential campaign saw the shift early, and now Barack Obama's campaign is taking it to the next level: The Internet has replaced television as the most critical communications medium in politics, as Generation X - the first generation to achieve Internet "literacy," and now in a position to dominate the medium - becomes the most important voting block on the American political landscape.

Generational research offered by marketing expert Ann Fishman suggests we have just begun to feel the impact of a shift away from the Baby Boom Generation, which has dominated American society since shortly after World War II; we are moving instead toward the more practical, results-oriented, "Internet-time" values of Gen X, as Xers become the dominant voice in American politics.     

Based on Fishman's research into the habits and values of American consumers, Generation X - ages 26 to 46, numbering more than 83 million Americans according to the 2000 census - has asserted itself as the leading force for change in American political life, a development confirmed by the recent furor over the "Hillary 1984" video.

Fishman said, "Gen Xers are practical realists, who realize the power of the Internet, and know that is where the 'action is' in American politics today. The Hillary 1984 video managed to shift the attention of media, and voters, online, within hours of its release."

She continued, "By shifting the debate from traditional news media online, via blogs and Internet advertising, Gen X is solidifying itself, and its preferred medium, as the dominant forces in the 2008 Presidential election; they are showing their ability to grab the media spotlight, to vet candidates and share information in rapid, "viral" streams - thus replacing Baby Boomers and the nightly news as the 'factors to watch' in understanding the shape of the political debate to come."

Understanding the Impact of Generation X

Generation Xers are the 93 Americans born between 1961 and 1981. They were "latch-key kids" - many of whom are children of Baby Boomers whose divorce rates were high, whose stay-at-home parenting habits were sporadic, and who often pursued idealistic civic causes at the expense of stable home environments. Xers had to fend for themselves from an early age and are a generation of practical "survivors" whose attitudes are reflected in their politics, values and consumer preferences.

Baby Boomers are the 79 million Americans who were born between 1943 and 1960. Among other trends, they presided over the relaxation of societal standards in a variety of areas, including the liberalization of rules governing the traditional family, loosening strictures on corporate responsibility, and the popularization of the drug culture.

Fishman, who has studied the Gen X and Baby Boom Generations for more than a decade, argues that American society is in the midst of a generational transition, a transition that will impact American values, attitudes and lifestyles. As the transition unfolds, the political environment will increasingly be driven by the values, attitudes and lifestyles of the younger generations.

About Ann Fishman and Generational Targeted-Marketing

More information on Ann Fishman's generational expertise can be found at http://www.annfishman.com. Fishman's company, Generational-Targeted Marketing Corp. (GTM), is a specialized marketing firm providing insight into consumer preferences, buying habits and trends affecting the American consumer. As GTM's president, Fishman has served as a consultant to numerous corporations, government agencies and non-profit organizations on generational issues and also serves as a member of the Adjunct Faculty at New York University. For further information on GTM, call 1-504-866-7624.

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MICHAEL FRENKEL
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