Ontario law firm, Natale Law Office, allegly sends bogus collection letters to Canadians

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Ontario law firm allegly sends bogus collection letters to Canadians Natale's Law Office, based in Ontario, has allegedly been sending out bogus demand collection letters to its collection list. This allegation from the Canadian Money Advisor's website, http://www.canadian-money-advisor.ca

Regina, SK March 29, 2007     For more information please contact:9511

Ontario law firm allegly sends bogus collection letters to Canadians
Natale's Law Office, based in Ontario, has allegedly been sending out bogus demand collection letters to its collection list. This allegation from the Canadian Money Advisor's website, http://www.canadian-money-advisor.ca (the site).

According to the website in early March 2007, unhappy postings began to appear stating collection lawyer Deanna Natale and her law firm were sending out bogus demand letters. (Refer to: http://www.canadian-money-advisor.ca/threadview/457.html)

The demand letters were form letters which included the person's correct name and address, but were demanding payment from creditor companies and dollar amounts that the site's visitors weren't familiar with.

Both surprised and frightened by these letters, the blog visitors were curious how the law firm both acquired their personal information, as well as why a law firm would send them collection demand letters.

One week after the initial post, the Canadian Money Advisor's website's traffic logs indicated hundreds of visitors with the same concern. People desperate to find out information searched by the keywords, "Deanna Natale", and "Natale Law Office", on various search engines such as google.com, msn.com, and yahoo.com.

Quote from the site by "Eric Canada":
"My wife received a form 7A and letter from Deanna Natale in Feb/07 stating she owed Global Credit about $800 from an old Department store account in southern Ontario. The letter threatened Small Claims Court action unless she paid within 15 days. The account supposedly is from 2000, and my wife has never even heard of Global nor ever been contacted or received any information from them ever. The department store account does not ring any bells either. She asked Deanna via a letter and telephone conversation for a copy of the transaction slips and accompanying signatures that would normally be required to prove a debt but was simply told that they would only be presented in Court if she didn't pay"

This suggested that the problem might be wide spread across Canada.

Top four tips to determine a bogus letter of demand
On it's site, Canadian Money Advisor recommends the public answer the following questions to determine a bogus demand letter:
1) Is the creditor in question a company you've dealt with previously and with whom you've had a legal agreement?
2) Is the amount of the debt being claimed familiar to you?
3) Is the law firm legally and contractually authorized to collect a debt on behalf of the creditor?
4) If the creditor is a company with which you've dealt in the past, is your account with them paid up to date and current?

What to do if you receive a "bogus" or unfamiliary demand letter from a law firm:
Canadian Money Advisor recommends what to do when a collection demand letter ends up in your mailbox.
1) Contact the lawyers office and ask them for name of the creditor they represent.
2) Ask the lawyer for a copy of the contract that allegedly created the debt. This contract would have your original signature on it. (In most cases).
3) Contact the Law Society in your province and ask if there have been similar complaints about this law firm.
4) Contact your local provincial Justice Department - Consumer Protection department and ask for their advice as to how to deal with this creditor's actions.

What to do if you have received a bogus demand letter
The public may or may not want to contact the following organizations to make other people aware of the problem.
1) Better Business Bureau - Visit: http://www.bbb.org
2) PhoneBusters - which is the anti-fraud call center run by the RCMP. Visit: http://www.phonebusters.com
3) You local Law Society which will have a complaint department to deal with these issues. Each province Law Society is listed on the site: http://canadian-money-advisor.ca/credit-complaint-resources.html

About Canadian Money Advisor
Canadian Money Advisor was established in 2005 as a financial forum / blog web site where Canadians can talk about their experiences in dealing with collection agencies, credit bureaus, creditors and many other financial industries in Canada. The site helps people better understand their contractual and legal relationship, in layman's terms, with the credit related companies they deal with.

Site Usage Disclaimer: The information on the site is meant as a guide for people at the beginning learning stages about their personal credit matters. As there are no lawyers or legally trained staff who administer the website, site staff recommend that visitors always contact the proper authorities for further consultation and advice on any legal matters.

Notes for editors:
For more information phone:
Monty Loree - Site Administrator
HomeGrown Advertising Inc (1994)
PH: 306-949-9511

Or visit:
http://www.canadian-money-advisor.ca/contact.html
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MONTY LOREE
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