New Process Reduces, Even Eliminates Visual Effects of Scratches on Movie Film

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Video producer Steven Martin has announced the development of a new, cost-effective "wet frame" film restoring process that dramatically reduces the visual effects of scratches and other damage to motion picture film. According to Martin, the new process, dubbed WetFrame, leaves film cleaner than when it first leaves the developing lab. In addition, it visually eliminates "film crystallization" -- that dirty, snowflake-like appearance that interferes with viewing. "WetFrame should be of particular interest to filmmakers, historical organizations, libraries and video transfer labs," notes Martin, "as well as anyone that is planning to transfer irreplaceable motion picture films to digital media, such as DVDs."

Video producer Steven Martin has announced the development of a new, cost-effective "wet frame" film restoring process that dramatically reduces the visual effects of scratches and other damage to motion picture film. According to Martin, the new process, dubbed WetFrame, leaves film cleaner than when it first leaves the developing lab. In addition, it visually eliminates "film crystallization" -- that dirty, snowflake-like appearance that interferes with viewing. "WetFrame should be of particular interest to filmmakers, historical organizations, libraries and video transfer labs," notes Martin, "as well as anyone that is planning to transfer irreplaceable motion picture films to archival digital media, such as DVDs."

Steve Yankee, founder of the Video Business Advisor and a long-time supplier of film transfers comments, "I looked carefully at the before-and-after film clips supplied to us by Steven, and I'm amazed at the difference. The improvements in film 'readability' are obvious, impressive and exciting."

WetFrame is a proprietary, seven-component chemical application. According to Martin, it can be a time consuming process, sometimes requiring multiple applications, depending upon the condition of
the film being treated. It was developed primarily to remove the effects of film crystallization -- gray snowflake-like deterioration to the clear film base. Crystallization apparently forms due to an improper developing process. "It is unstoppable," says Martin, "but our new process renders it invisible. It also removes the visual effects of many scratches and cleans off most dust and other types of debris from the film surface."

WetFrame gives results much like wet-gate processing; an expensive film treatment typically used by major motion picture companies when transferring their films to DVD. Now, consumers can obtain similar results for far less cost.

Some additional benefits are that WetFrame removes a fair amount of debris that is imbedded into the emulsion -up until now, a fairly difficult task. Some forms of fungus are cleaned off as well, leaving a significantly brighter picture. Residue from lab processing gets removed. Streaks from previous cleanings are rendered optically invisible. The process is safe for both magnetic and optical sound films. There is a very slight increase in contrast and color saturation, notes Martin, which actually improves the overall color tone of the film.

For more information about the WetFrame process, contact Martin at (913) 322-1413, or email customerservice @ accentvideo.us. More information and sample clips are available at http://www.accentvideo.us.

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