Six Sigma Golf?

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What do the cost reduction strategies of Six Sigma and golf have in common? Everything it seems. On May 1st, Jay Arthur, the KnowWare® Man, will speak to the American Society for Quality World Conference in Orlando on how to improve their golf game using the power of Six Sigma.

What do the cost reduction strategies of Six Sigma and golf have in common? Everything it seems. What separates Tiger Woods from the average golfer? Tiger makes far fewer mistakes and has much less variation in distance and accuracy. The average golfer makes putts from inside eight feet 50% of the time; pros make 66% of those putts.

On May 1st, Jay Arthur, the KnowWare® Man, will speak to the American Society for Quality World Conference in Orlando on how to apply Six Sigma to golf. And attendees will get to practice the methods of Six Sigma on putting greens.

Six Sigma focuses on:
·    Reducing variation (i.e., consistency)
·    Reducing mistakes and errors

In golf, players can hit a ball too fat or too thin, too long or too short, and too far left or right. Few golfers can hit the same shot to exactly the same spot time after time. But the ability to hit the same shot close to the same spot time after time is what separates the pros from the duffers.

The 80/20 rule: 80% of all shots lost to par occur within 100 yards of the hole. What do most weekend golfers practice? The drive. What should they practice? Pitching, chipping and putting.

Dave Pelz, author of the Putting and Short Game Bibles, recommends players use a straight stroke instead of a screendoor swing for putting. Why? Less variation. He also suggests that the correct speed for a putt will carry it 17 inches beyond the hole. Why? A donut mound develops around the hole during play. Putts need enough speed to stay on line at the hole.

How can you tell if your putts stay on line and travel the right distance? Jay will show attendees how to use a Six Sigma checksheet to track their hits and misses.

Similarly, simple analysis of a tee shot can determine if the player's swing is true and whether the club face is open (slice) or closed (hook) at impact. The same is true of iron shots.

Jay's 24-page Six Sigma Golf book and CD are available from http://www.qimacros.com or by calling (888) 468-1535. Readers can download a free Six Sigma Action Plan and software, plus signup for an email course in Six Sigma Simplified at http://www.qimacros.com.

On May 1st in Orlando, Jay Arthur will show attendees at ASQ's World Quality Conference how to improve their golf game using the power of Six Sigma.

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