New York Lead Poisoning Lawyer Comments on Nationwide Recall of Fisher-Price Toys

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The Approximately 967,000 Fisher-Price Toys recalled may contain lead paint, which may pose a serious risk to children's health and mental development.

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It is vital that parents who are concerned that their children may have become lead poisoned as a result of playing with these Fisher-Price toys, have a venous blood test administered to their affected child to verify the presence and amount of lead in their child's bloodstream.

Today, Fisher-Price Inc., of East Aurora, NY, announced a massive recall of approximately 967,000 toys which may contain high levels of lead paint. This is the second major toy recall in less than three months, following in the wake of the Thomas the Tank Engine recall to involve products that may contain lead paint and possibly pose a serious risk to children's health and mental development.

The Fisher-Price recall encompasses a number of Sesame Street, Dora the Explorer, and other toys that were manufactured between April 19, 2007, and July 6, 2007. A number of these toys potentially containing lead paint may bear a date code ranging between 109-7LF and 187-7LF, which can be found on either the product itself or its packaging materials.

Commenting on the subject of this Fisher-Price recall Alan J. Konigsberg, New York lead poisoning lawyer and a senior partner at Levy Phillips & Konigsberg, LLP, observed that, "It is vital that parents who are concerned that their children may have become lead poisoned as a result of playing with these Fisher-Price toys, have a venous blood test administered to their affected child to verify the presence and amount of lead in their child's bloodstream."

To learn more about this Fisher-Price recall, please click on the following link to visit website of the website of the Consumer Product Safety Commission: http://www.cpsc.gov/cpscpub/prerel/prhtml07/07257.html

For a child, even a small amount of lead-based paint is potentially dangerous if chips, peels, or otherwise create dust and has been ingested or inhaled. Children may also be exposed if they chew or suck on a toy that has been coated in lead paint. Because no quantity of lead is safe in the body, a brief exposure to lead can cause significant adverse effects. Besides learning difficulties, elevated levels of lead in the bloodstream are also associated with behavioral problems such as aggressiveness, destructiveness, and hyperactivity.

For more information about this Fisher-Price recall and lead poisoning liability, please visit lpklaw.com or contact Alan J. Konigsberg, a leading lead poisoning lawyer in New York, at (212) 605-6200 or akonigsberg @ lpklaw.com.

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Jay Berkowitz
CEPAC
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