Electronic Monitoring Resource Center Launches for Criminal Justice Personnel

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As the use of Electronic Monitoring technology increases, it is critical that public safety agencies have the information they need to implement the technology in the best possible manner. This need led to the creation of the Electronic Monitoring Resource Center (EMRC) now available at: https://emresourcecenter.nlectc.du.edu.

Currently in the United States, electronic monitoring (EM) technology is used as a tool to help supervise an estimated 125,000 offenders. By year-end 2008, this number will push towards 200,000 offenders. This increase will occur, in large part, as a result of the implementation of a number of state legislative mandates regarding Global Positioning System (GPS) tracking of offenders.

As the use of EM technology increases, it is critical that agencies have the information they need to implement the technology in the best possible manner. This need led to the creation of the Electronic Monitoring Resource Center (EMRC) now available at: https://emresourcecenter.nlectc.du.edu

Funded by a grant from the National Institute of Justice and managed by the National Law Enforcement and Corrections Technology Center - Rocky Mountain Region. (NLECTC-RM), the password protected site is strictly for law enforcement and corrections professionals. The intent is to provide a secure environment for sharing information and exchanging ideas. The EM resource center contains a large number of documents on legal issues, legislation, news articles, procurement help, program administration, reports, research and technology. This resource is provided at no cost.

"It is our hope that the criminal justice community can use the resource center to quickly find the information they need for their agency. The forum feature can also be used by members to communicate directly with each other and to discuss areas of common concern," says Joe Russo, Assistant Director with NLECTC-RM.

This project was supported by Cooperative Agreement No. 2005-IJ-CX-K001 awarded by the Office of Justice Programs' National Institute of Justice, US Department of Justice. The opinions, findings, and conclusions or recommendations expressed in this publication/program/exhibition are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the views of the Department of Justice.

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George Drake
NLECTC_RM
(505) 299-1568
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