The Alliance for Eating Disorders Awareness Calls Upon Apple Inc. to Change New IMAC Campaign Claiming That, "You Can't Be Too Thin. Or Too Powerful."

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Apple's new IMAC Campagin states that, "You can't be too thin. Or too powerful." The Alliance for Eating Disorders Awareness calls upon Apple to rethink their new media campaign. In society in which 7 -10 million Americans are struggling with eating disorders, and messages from the media are influential and they do make a difference, The Alliance questions, "Is Apple taking a revamping of the Duchess of Windsor's adage a step to far?"

The Alliance for Eating Disorders Awareness reacted today to the new Apple Inc IMAC Campaign, "The new iMac. You can't be too thin. Or too powerful." The Alliance questions, "What kind of message is Apple sending our youth with an ad campaign of this nature?"

The truth is one CAN be too thin. According to the American Psychological Association, in the United States alone 7 -10 million individuals are struggling with eating disorders. Of that 10 to 20 percent of them will not survive their struggle. Eating disorders not only have extreme physical and mental repercussions - including the highest mortality rate among all psychological disorders but they also act as a barrier for personal growth, achievement, education, and success. We live in a society in which Messages from the media are influential and they do make a difference.

"As not only the Executive Director of The Alliance, but also a recovering anorectic and exercise bulimic, I must say that I find the new IMAC campaign troubling and extremely triggering," said Johanna Kandel. "Apple's revamping of the Duchess of Windsor's adage draws a direct connection between being thin and being powerful. While this concept may work well from a technological perspective, it can become deadly in the eyes of an individual that is genetically predisposed to developing an eating disorder."

According to a study by Gaesser (1996), over 1/2 the females between the ages of 18-25 would prefer to be run over by a truck then be fat, and 2/3 surveyed would rather be mean or stupid. Many individuals define their self worth, their happiness, their successes on their ability to achieve the ultimate "ideal." The struggle goes on indefinitely until death demands it cannot go on anymore. This is the struggle that The Alliance for Eating Disorders Awareness and like organizations fight on a daily basis. This is the struggle millions of Americans, both male and female, endure.

The Alliance is concerned that the new IMAC Campaign, while well intentioned, has the potential to push a young girl with low self-esteem into a deadly disease or trigger a person struggling with recovery back into the throws of an eating disorder. "The negative implications are too numerous to count. There must be a better way to sell computers then to utilize this dangerous slogan," said Ms. Kandel.

In October of 2000, The Alliance for Eating Disorders Awareness (The Alliance) was created as a source of community outreach, education, awareness, and prevention of the various eating disorders currently plaguing our nation. Since its inception, The Alliance has offered presentations on eating disorders and their prevention to over 60,000 individuals, as well as advocates for change in eating disorders legislation. Through presentations, workshops, phone and email support, treatment referrals, support groups, and information packets, the Alliance offers opportunities for individuals to receive the information the need free of charge.

For more information, please contact The Alliance for Eating Disorders Awareness at 866.622.1235 or at http://www.eatingdisorderinfo.org

Contacts:
Johanna S. Kandel, Executive Director

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