Katrina Two Years Later: With 160,000 Displaced New Orleans Citizens Weary of Talk, Desert Bayou Takes Action

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Two years after Hurricane Katrina, as the struggle to collect promised aid, return home, rebuild and recover looms perilously close to failure, a story being told by some 600 New Orleans evacuees may not have had a voice without Taproot Productions' documentary Desert Bayou.

On the second anniversary of the hurricane that resulted in the worst U.S. natural disaster ever ..."slow, insufficient and misguided federal policy is keeping tens of thousands of displaced American families from realizing their human right to return and rebuild their lives and communities." (Jeffrey Buchanan, Blueprint for Gulf Renewal, August/September 2007)*. Two years later, as the struggle to collect promised aid, return home, rebuild and recover looms perilously close to failure, a story being told by some 600 New Orleans evacuees may not have had a voice without Taproot Productions' documentary Desert Bayou.

Featuring Master P, whose parents were among the displaced and Utah-transferred evacuees, Desert Bayou centers on the experiences of two families in this group who found themselves not only forced from the only homes they knew, but literally sequestered on planes, plopped into a desert on an available military base 45 minutes outside of Salt Lake City, and forced to maneuver in a chess game ruled by members of
a predominantly white, racially ignorant and nearly exclusively Mormon enclave.

Faced with a continued bureaucratic indifference that began following the disaster, the personal stories that emerge from the evacuees add a very human element to a story that was unfathomable by most of the nation and now nearly incomprehensible by those who hear their stories, review news clips of both the Utah Governor, Mayor of Salt Lake City and, comically, a few of the less enlightened citizens of Salt Lake City. The victims' conflicts and personal growth is portrayed from fear and isolation to discovery and solution.

"Desert Bayou gives voice to those victims who suffered the aftermath of
a tragedy that evolved on a daily basis," says director Alex LeMay (The Bulls of Suburbia ). "In the midst of this process, there are chronicles of plenty of good deeds, good people and community; religious and social figures whose good will eventually prevails

LeMay's recently completed documentary, Desert Bayou, will open October 5, 2007 in both New York and New Orleans, followed by a platformed release in several U.S. cities, and is distributed by Cinema Libre Studio.

About Cinema Libre Studio
Cinema Libre Studio is a haven for independent filmmakers with views, offering one-stop shopping for production, co-production, and distribution, foreign sales, marketing, and post-production services. Headquartered in Los Angeles, the company is best known for distributing social issue documentaries and narrative features in theatres and on DVD which include Outfoxed, Uncovered: The War on Iraq, The Empire in Africa, Conventioneers, Darfur Diaries and many more, including Angels in the Dust with Participant Productions, opening September 14, 2007 in New York and September 28 in Los Angeles and various cities.

For more information visit http://www.cinemalibrestudio.com

About Taproot Productions
Taproot Productions, LLC is a Chicago-based production and post-production facility that has been delivering award-winning motion pictures and commercial media for fourteen years. Taproot operates a robust commercial and corporate media department and is a leader in creating rich media for the web.

For more information visit http://www.taprootproductions.com

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Cathy Mouton

Beth Protello
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