Arizona Doctor Addresses Michael Moore's Film 'Sicko' and the Film's Relevance to the Upcoming Presidential Election

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"Although the brouhaha surrounding the release of Michael Moore's documentary film 'Sicko' is weaning," states Dr. Dyson, "the value of the film's revealing contents about America's healthcare system should not wane. There is an urgent need for change in our current health care system; a change for those with medical coverage and the millions who are uninsured. It is important to elect a Presidential candidate for 2008, that has a healthcare plan that includes affordable health insurance for all Americans; lower costs of healthcare; a preventive health initiative; and the prohibition of insurance companies from redlining patients with existing health problems."

Following a recent screening of Michael Moore's documentary film Sicko in New York City, Dr. Mwata O. Dyson, CEO and founder of Paradise Anesthesia in Scottsdale, Arizona, comments publicly on the film and its relevance to the 2008 Presidential election.

"Although the brouhaha surrounding the release of Michael Moore's documentary film Sicko is weaning," states Dr. Dyson, "the value of the film's revealing contents about America's healthcare system should not wane." In a critique of the documentary he further notes, "The saddest part of Sicko is that it shows that even when one puts their life on the limb for their country as in the 9/11 disaster, our healthcare system as it stands, will deny them proper care. If we have a system that does this to its heroes, how does a so-called average citizen have a chance to receive the care they deserve and most importantly, pay for? Healthcare will be one of the most critical issues for all of the Presidential candidates during the upcoming election season and will significantly impact each candidacy."

At the tender age of 34, Dr. Dyson took over as the Director of Anesthesia at an underserved hospital in Mesa, Arizona. As one of the youngest individuals to ever hold such a position the United States, he quickly began to understand the struggle that has dampened the current health care system. As a vital member of the medical executive committee, he worked diligently with the hospital CEO, directors of other medical departments, private and government insurance companies to assist in providing adequate care to the community and was integral in outlining the difficulties facing the medical community in providing comprehensive health care. But more importantly he understood the profound lack of investment and education of preventive medicine.

Dr. Dyson noticed that many of the procedures completed in the operating room could have been avoided if simple measures such as "diet" and "exercise" were implemented into daily activities and believes the lack of "education" and "accountability" is key in curving the escalating health care cost and medical conditions. "There is more than meets the eye or the camera's lens when it comes to getting better healthcare for American citizens," Dr. Dyson states. "It is not only incumbent for the healthcare industry to do right by its clients, but Americans must take some responsibility for their health, as well."

The struggles Dr. Dyson encountered during his tenure as director of anesthesia thrust him into more of an active role in the medical community about the need for a change in our current health care system; a change for those with medical coverage and the millions who are uninsured. "As a physician, I believe those Americans who are able to afford insurance are fortunate for its initial coverage of non-threatening life ailments. But beyond that lies the fault line of medical disaster," comments Dr. Dyson on experiencing first-hand the stresses often incurred by the procedures that are dictated and the guidelines that insurance companies place on doctors and on their patients.

President Bush has labeled the American health system "the best health system in the world." However, according to Dr. Dyson, "The United States isn't on the list of the top thirty countries in the world that have the highest number of physicians per 100,000 people. And, although it is accurately reported that Americans have a shorter wait period to see a physician, their time with the doctor is minimized by the number of people waiting to get into the treatment rooms. It is a sad reality that Americans spend more money on healthcare with less quality service (depending upon their affording of a premium insurance company) and tenure of their healthcare policy. "

Based on these insights, the Arizona based physician recognizes the film's relevance to the forthcoming 2008 presidential election. "Other candidates have addressed this issue, however I applaud the proposed healthcare plans presented by Barack Obama. The Senators' health care plan entails affordable health insurance for all Americans; lowering the costs of healthcare; instituting a preventive health initiative; prohibiting insurance companies from redlining patients with existing health problems; and, making the research and development investments needed to produce innovative treatments and cures."

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Maisha Daniels

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