Menopause Expert, Author Maryon Stewart, Founder of the Natural Health Advisory Service, Comments on Menopause Study Recently Published in the Online Edition of Neurology

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Author Maryon Stewart, Founder of the Natural Health Advisory Service and expert on managing menopause naturally, comments and provides some free brain boosting action tips on the results of a recent menopause study published in the online magazine Neurology

It's amazing how quickly women are responding to the study findings and wondering how it relates to modern hormone replacement therapies.

Author Maryon Stewart, Founder of the Natural Health Advisory Service and expert on managing menopause naturally, comments on the results of a recent study published in the online magazine Neurology.

"The study examined women who have surgery for removal of their ovaries (oophorectomy) before menopause," said Stewart. "The results suggest that women may face an increased risk of developing brain-related disorders, including cognitive decline or dementia. According to the lead investigator for the study, Dr. Walter A. Rocca and his associates at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, 'there is increasing evidence for a neuroprotective effect of estrogen...(but) the effect is age-dependent.'"

"The findings bring attention to important health and hormonal issues facing women in midlife," says Stewart. "It's amazing how quickly women are responding to the study findings and wondering how it relates to modern hormone replacement therapies."

Rocca and his colleagues observed a significant trend for increased risk of neurological deficits with younger age at surgery, unless the women received estrogen replacement therapy until at least 50 years of age.

"A lot of women are in the dark about estrogen and don't understand its relationship to symptoms of menopause," says Stewart. "They don't understand the invisible effects that depleted hormones cause on the brain. Among various other symptoms, we've found a direct connection between the drop in estrogen and memory loss. Rocca's findings confirm this, on a more empirical
level."

"There is good news," says Stewart. "Today, with changes in your diet, proper nutritional support including a diet rich in isoflavones, naturally occurring estrogen like substances, standardized supplements and lifestyle changes, memory problems associated with menopause can be corrected. In fact, balancing the brain chemistry can literally give you back your short-term memory. That's what we've been teaching and advocating since 1994 at our Natural Health Advisory Service Program."

Absent Memory Syndrome (AMS) has been defined by experts as a mid-life condition. You keep losing your train of thought mid-sentence or you forget where you have left your keys. And the reason? No one knows for sure but it's thought to be due to poor concentration or lack of motivation, tiredness, anxiety or stress rather than the loss of brain cells. Feeling fuzzy headed is also thought to be related to the hormonal ups and downs associated with menopause. Some parts of the brain that are particularly involved with verbal memory are rich in estrogen receptors so there could be a genuine physiological link between hormonal status and brain function. To learn more about Absent Memory Syndrome and to take the test of the most common AMS symptoms as well as brain boosting action solutions for Absent Memory Syndrome, go to http://www.askmaryonstewart.com

About Maryon Stewart
Maryon Stewart is an acknowledged pioneer of natural medicine, author of 24 self-help books and founder of the Natural Health Advisory Service, an advisory clinic created to help women deal with hormone issues naturally. She is also the inventor of the Natural Menopause Kit, an enlightening (and comforting) resource package of information and advice for women coping with menopause. Stewart is also the founder of http://www.askmaryonstewart.com a web portal designed for women to share and discuss issues related to health, nutrition and aging.

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