What Starvation Looks Like: Little Horse Recovers at Catskill Animal Sanctuary

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One month after his removal from a Dutchess County breeder, little Andy, an Appaloosa stallion, has gained seventy pounds and is able to stand solidly on spindly legs.

One month after his removal from a Dutchess County breeder, little Andy, an Appaloosa stallion, has gained seventy pounds and is able to stand solidly on spindly legs.

When Andy, above, arrived at Catskill Animal Sanctuary on August 1, he collapsed to the ground when he stepped off the trailer. Caretakers lifted him gently, and he inched forward on wobbly legs to his stall. For the first few days, he shook when he stood. Though three years old, Andy is the size of a yearling.

"I can't believe this animal is alive," commented director Kathy Stevens.

The young stallion was so starved for so long that caretakers were concerned that his body might be shutting down. But a month after his arrival, Andy has gained weight, is able to stand solidly, and walks slowly out to his pasture to graze.

Andy's owner, a breeder from Poughkeepsie, New York, has been arrested and charged with four counts of cruelty. She failed to appear in court for her bond hearing.

Catskill Animal Sanctuary (http://www.casanctuary.org) is a haven for horses and farm animals in Saugerties, New York. Since its opening in 2001, CAS has saved the lives of 1,100 animals. Director Kathy Stevens is author of the newly released book Where the Blind Horse Sings: Love and Healing at an Animal Sanctuary (http://www.blindhorsesings.com). CAS is open to the public Saturdays and Sundays through October.

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