Florida Law Firm Opens Advisory Service for Patients Injured by MRI Scans

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Gadolinium, a metal that is found in contrast drugs used by radiologists in performing MRI's, is believed to cause a kidney condition called nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF). The Alvarez Law Firm announces a new service to provide assistance to patients who may have been harmed when getting an MRI.

If a person is diagnosed with NFS or NFD then that person can bring a legal case regardless of whether the he or she was aware of having an existing kidney condition

Gadolinium, a metal that is found in contrast drugs used by radiologists in performing MRI's, is believed to cause a kidney condition called nephrogenic systemic fibrosis (NSF). The Alvarez Law Firm announces a new service to provide assistance to patients who may have been harmed when getting an MRI.

"The MRI is no doubt a great tool to medical science, but some of the radiological materials that are used in today's MRI scans are hazardous, especially for those who have kidney problems," declares Alex Avarez.

Alvarez, the managing partner of the Alvarez Law Firm in Coral Gables, Florida (http://www.integrityforjustice.com), announced that his personal injury law firm has opened an advisory service for people who think they may have developed a severe kidney disorder as a result of having MRI scans.

Alvarez explained that the disorder in question is NSF or nephrogenic systemic fibrosis, and it is characterized by a "fibrosis of the skin and connective tissues throughout their body." That is, a patient experiences skin thickening which inhibits the extension and contraction of their joints and restricts movement. In addition, patients may develop widespread fibrosis of other organs and "it can even lead to death,'' adds Alvarez.

The chemical agent believed to be responsible for triggering NSF is gandolinium. Gandolinium is a rare earth element that is not found naturally in the human body. Because of its paramagnetic properties, solutions of organic gadolinium complexes and gadolinium compounds are used as intravenous radio contrast agents to enhance images in medical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

"The radicontrast drugs that are given during MRI scans may be fine for some patients, but not for those with existing kidney ailments, as it may lead to NSF," says Alvarez.

Gadolinium which is used in many contrast agents is poisonous. To protect the body from direct contact with gadolinium used in injections, the gadolinium in the solution is chemically combined with chelates.

In a person with normally functioning kidneys, gadolinium is eliminated from the body is less than two hours, and the chelate compounds are stable for at least this long. However, in people with kidney impairment, it might take up to 36 hours to eliminate gadolinium.

Nephrogenic Systemic Fibrosis (NSF), also known as nephrogenic fibrosing dermopathy (NFD), is a condition that, so far, has occurred only in people with kidney disease.

At this time, the only people known to be at risk are those who had gadolinium injected in connection with an MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan or an MRA (magnetic resonance angiography) or who, at the time of MRI or MRA, had kidney failure or kidney function problems.

"If a person is diagnosed with NFS or NFD then that person can bring a legal case regardless of whether the he or she was aware of having an existing kidney condition," says Alvarez.

"We set up our advisory service to help sufferers gain knowledge and rightful compensation for damages caused by these chemical agents. We welcome all questions on the subject," added Alvarez.

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